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Key Tower 947'
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  1. Exactly. 4-storeys is fine for the old width of Liberty Street, but not the current width. If I were the folks putting together the proposal, I'd dig up old photos of Liberty Street pre-widening and figure out the building height to street width ratio of the corridor. It's probably something like 2:1. Then I'd figure out what building height achieves the same ratio with today's widened road. It'd probably be 7-8 stories, if not more. If all building have to maintain this 4-storey limit, but keep the current width of Liberty Street, it will always feel more wide than tall and limit it from ever becoming a 'place' like it once was. This notion that building height should be the primary thing driving preservation misses out on so many other aspects of urban design that create great spaces and provide enclosure that makes OTR walkable and feel like a giant outdoor living room.
  2. Yikes. What a sad outcome. That thing needs to be stopped.
  3. The main reason this has sat vacant is because the floor plate is on the smaller side for new Class A tenants these days. Smaller floor plates work in other parts of town, but this being the central business district, most tenants that want to go here want bigger floor plates.
  4. College Hill seems like a logical spot. It has a semi-attractive NBD with some ‘been there for years’ small businessss and lots of potential. It already seems to be happening a bit, I thought....?
  5. When he started shaming homeless/folks with addiction issues by filming them, patronizing them and posting it on his feed, I stopped following him and never looked back. I found him toxic.
  6. The ingredients for walkability aren’t big single use buildings serviced by big parking garages taking up entire blocks that are next to wide roads with high speeds. It’s diversity of built form, many uses, serviced by transit in human scale.
  7. Wow. Great update and set. So nice to see so much positive change in OTR and DT. But man, I gotta say, that new Kroger building is not one of those. Thank goodness it'll have that long chased grocery store, but, yikes, that paneling/massive parking garage/flat facade - it is a blight. And a big F U to Central Pkwy. Tell me it is better in person...
  8. Vine Street in OTR actually could use tons of bump outs, raised crossings, ped priority lighting, which you can install without ripping up the curb. I’d start there honestly. Just keep stormwater running as is and build an island out, with a metal grate covering the existing storm water drainage. See the bump out and metal grate example in the link below. https://goo.gl/maps/uRMMmLAtUXT2
  9. Pedestrian malls CAN work wonderfully, if there is already a lot of foot traffic and latent demand for more pedestrian space. They shouldn’t be put just anywhere. This was the mistake of the past - thinking a random physical design could just attract the people. Instead, best practice today follows the behavior of people first and designs accordingly. This notion that pedestrian only streets don’t work full stop isn’t true. Philly is putting in new pedestrian only alleyways, every Australian city has countless pedestrian only lanes, many of which command the highest rent/sf in the Southern Hemisphere, of course New York now has jumped on the bandwagon, big parts of Central European cities are ped only, etc. If they’re going to be redoing Court St then sure, make improvements, but in general Cincinnati should identify the streets where the most pedestrians already are and make those the best pedestrian experience possible. And then see where the bottlenecks are (like Central Parkway at Main). This will build momentum and give the political evidence needed to do it elsewhere.
  10. It looks exactly like what I would expect a gay bar to look like. Super camp and over the top tacky/cheesy. This is done on purpose.
  11. Well, yea. LA Metro is more dense than NY metro but to best of my knowledge LA proper isn’t more dense than NYC. It is the same effect, essentially.
  12. Ok, but it doesn't take too much creativity to make a convention space work and have sleeved retail, just like Class A office buildings that get their big floorplates and still provide fine grain retail shops on the ground floor. Sydney's new convention center has ground floor cafes facing the park that it sits on. It isn't 'best practice' but it is at least moving towards activating what would otherwise be dull spaces. https://www.google.com/maps/[/member]-33.8750228,151.2009625,3a,75y,209.57h,88.02t/data=!3m8!1e1!3m6!1sAF1QipM1B6uGZQCZDZZVZR1hrtuf2q9aV9WInbJEs3gc!2e10!3e11!6shttps:%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com%2Fp%2FAF1QipM1B6uGZQCZDZZVZR1hrtuf2q9aV9WInbJEs3gc%3Dw203-h100-k-no-pi-0-ya53.734867-ro-0-fo100!7i8704!8i4352 Why won't the link work? When I 'preview' it works fine. Any insight?
  13. Ok, but it doesn't take too much creativity to make a convention space work and have sleeved retail, just like Class A office buildings that get their big floorplates and still provide fine grain retail shops on the ground floor. Sydney's new convention center has ground floor cafes facing the park that it sits on. It isn't 'best practice' but it is at least moving towards activating what would otherwise be dull spaces. https://www.google.com/maps/[/member]-33.8750228,151.2009625,3a,75y,209.57h,88.02t/data=!3m8!1e1!3m6!1sAF1QipM1B6uGZQCZDZZVZR1hrtuf2q9aV9WInbJEs3gc!2e10!3e11!6shttps:%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com%2Fp%2FAF1QipM1B6uGZQCZDZZVZR1hrtuf2q9aV9WInbJEs3gc%3Dw203-h100-k-no-pi-0-ya53.734867-ro-0-fo100!7i8704!8i4352
  14. The convention center would do a lot of good to activate its perimeter. Sleeving retail in key locations would help. I never understood why it is seen as a given that convention centers have to be big boxes with no street activation. A lot of CBD destination retailers still offer great window displays/art installations that are quite interactive. This would also help.
  15. So many beautiful photos. Cincinnati is such a photogenic city. Unfortunately these photos capture how eerily underpopulated the streets are. Where are the people?!
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