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jmecklenborg

Jeddah Tower 3,281'
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  1. I have only visited Montreal once, in 2002. A guy came up on the sidewalk and asked me for directions in French. I don't know why this guy profiled me as someone who not only a) was from there b) spoke French. We quickly realized we were completely unable to communicate and we walked our separate ways. Outside of Quebec, French is spoken on various Caribbean islands and several 20~ million population African countries. So they really (along with Spain) struck out as compared to England when it came to colonizing areas that rose to dominance in the 20th century. Today, much of London's rise as the center of European commerce, and by many measures the world's most important city, is due to New York (also arguably the world's most important city) doing business in English. Thanks to India and Australia and Hong Kong, plus many Japanese and Koreans learning English after WWII, China and smaller SE Asian countries have all been forced to learn English. If Mao had never existed and an open China had risen in the 1950s and 1960s alongside Japan and Korea, English would play a lesser role in the Far East. Also, English got a foothold in the Arab world when oil was struck and the U.S. helped form ARAMCO.
  2. Memphis is currently, by far, the #1 cargo airport in the United States. As we all know, Memphis used to be Tennessee's top city but keeps sinking relative to Nashville and the rest of the United States. In coming years CVG will likely surpass Memphis in tonnage but not employees because Prime Air will have strict size and weight limits and won't deal at all with hazardous cargo or international orders. UPS, FedEx, and DHL all deal with oversized shipments, international, hazardous, etc. Plus there are collect orders and all sorts of complications like that. Prime Air will be much more automated because packages will be limited in size and weight, there will be no international crap to worry about, no handwritten bills, etc. That slashes the necessary workforce because it takes a lot of manpower and training to deal with the unusual stuff that the other carriers have to deal with.
  3. The French language thing was a disaster for Montreal and Quebec. The English language not only dominates Canada but increasingly the entire world. People in India and China and the Arab countries are learning English, not French. Plus, many people in Quebec simply do not know English. At all. Maybe they can count to 10 but that's about it.
  4. The whole French Quarter phenomenon is a bit of a fake. The area was never the city's red light district or any kind of special attention until the 1960s. The House of the Rising Sun stuff actually occurred in an area that was completely demolished on the opposite side of Rampart. The actual notorious part of New Orleans in the 1800s and early 1900s was here: https://www.google.com/maps/place/New+Orleans,+LA/@29.9608825,-90.0747476,1015m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x8620a454b2118265:0xdb065be85e22d3b4!8m2!3d29.9510658!4d-90.0715323 You can see the outline of a former railroad station and its approach tracks slashing diagonally across the site, and then of course the public housing and RV park (!) that took this historic area's place.
  5. I bet people will still sell drugs down on that roadway outside the flood wall.
  6. The section near Edwards Rd. was built 10 years before the part closer to I-71. To have built a connection in the middle would have meant breaking leases with absolutely no benefit to the bottom line.
  7. Yes. Three people are still living in homes they own in the 400 block of Bauer. Additionally, a gentleman named Lloyd Tate owns the vacant lot at the SE corner of Central Ave. & Bauer. People have been trying to contact the guy for a year but he is not responding. There is also a rogue entity named Odd Lots, LLC, that owns a 20x90 lot at the NW corner of Central Ave. & Wade. This LLC got the lot for free from the Auditor in 2015. The lot immediately north of that WAS LOST TO THE AUDITOR IN DECEMBER 2018 FOR NOT PAYING TAXES. So some IDIOT stopped paying the $60 in annual property tax and lost a lot that was worth roughly $50,000. How does this sort of thing happen? Well it's possible that they didn't know they owned it. The two lots I briefly owned near the stadium site were each owned by companies that didn't know they owned them. One got one of the lots when they bought another company and the other bought out somebody else's real estate portfolio and never got in the car and looked at it. The guy owned it for 10 years and literally never drove by it.
  8. Or the guy from the "Simply Money" radio show who lost $2.4 million: https://www.citybeat.com/news/article/13009751/not-so-simple Plus, it's no coincidence that BoA's Cincinnati office is in the Kenwood Connection, or whatever it's called -- they foreclosed on that damn thing.
  9. They portrayed the St. Bernard Soap Co. as an abandoned building but we all know it's a very active manufacturing site. In fact, the rail cars they show a second later serve the plant, I believe. Also, the "abandoned" brick warehouse they drive past is used for storage. Also, as someone who works in an industrial park, I can vouch that there is no vacancy and many companies have outgrown their buildings. Some companies near us have employees parking on the grass every morning. We bring in a lot of low-level stuff from China and the quality of the stuff and reliability of their vendors have gotten better over the past 10 years.
  10. The Suspension Bridge and other Cincinnati scenes appeared as B-roll on a recent episode of Frontline. The footage begins at 4:50:
  11. Where did the guy's money come from? He seems completely detached from reality.
  12. This building stood until 1998 or 1999. It was the tallest in Newport and stood at the exact site of the...bell.
  13. The reaction to my photo made me think today at work about what it would take to do a full Cincinnati > Cleveland > Cincinnati up-and-back. Nobody has done a Vlog featuring this ride, unlike the Katy Trail, the Allegheny Passage, etc. Unfortunately you'd really have to haul ass because nobody who isn't retired can take off more than a week to do 650 miles. You'd want a zero day so a Saturday to Sunday ride would mean about 100 miles per day, which is tough to do on anything other than a light road bike. Unfortunately you'd have some saddle soreness issues if you're averaging 10-11mph on a loaded bike. You could average more like 14-15mph on a road bike with a small amount of stuff so for that reason alone you might have to opt for the road bike, just to cut down on the hours of sitting in a saddle. But if you ride a road bike you aren't going to be able to pack full camping supplies plus "luxuries" like an extra pair of shoes. If you rode a road bike you'd have to switch out the clipless pedals either for flats or for mountain bike clipless so that you would have shoes to walk around in at the campsite. But just imagine screwing up the shoes in camp so that you can't clip in the next morning. That's the kind of crap that can waste a full day out there!
  14. I am not optimistic about the final Downtown Cincinnati approach ever being built. The roadblocks are amazingly complicated. The good news is that the ride on Riverside Drive between Lunken and Downtown Cincinnati is pretty easy as-is. The one significant missing link in the Cincinnati area aside from the downtown situation is a bike-only bridge over the Little Miami River, which is scheduled to be built soon, in 2020 or 2021: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Lunken+Airport+Trail,+Cincinnati,+OH+45226/@39.1102638,-84.4016708,542m/data=!3m1!1e3!4m5!3m4!1s0x8841ade3bfe59d69:0x42dbac4ae86ac055!8m2!3d39.1078371!4d-84.4228429 Newtown is the point where rails-to-trails must end because the railroad is still fairly active at that point. That's why the Miami-Erie trail crosses the Little Miami in Newtown and then travels on a purpose-built trail through golf courses and ball fields to the point where it must re-cross the river to reach the existing Lunken Airport perimeter trail. The Newtown bridge was built around 2005 and it looks like we're facing a full 15+ year wait to get back over the bridge.
  15. I rode from Cincinnati to Columbus twice in 2009. Progress near Cincinnati has been minimal but it looks like the trail has extended past the random corn field where I remember it ending in 2009, about six miles east of London. I had to ride on Broad St. for about 17 miles to the state house. Maybe later this summer I'll take a week off and ride up to Cleveland and back. 640 miles in 8 days is pretty rough on anything other than a road bike and you can't carry much stuff on a road bike.
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