Jump to content

cityscapes

Dirt Lot 0'
  • Content Count

    40
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

12 Good

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Telsa is moving into the HH Gregg space. It's to be a vehicle delivery and maintenance space and is much bigger than the current location.
  2. I don't get why they want to go through all that effort to move the building all for a drive through. First of all, the city should be making zoning code changes to prevent auto oriented uses going in on inner city urban streets like this. The demolition of a historic structure is a separate issue. This type of use would be fine on a street like Bethel Road but not in the Brewery District. Is it that hard to build a non-drive through restaurant with a 0 setback building and parking in the rear?
  3. It’s the new Aloft Hotel but it’s in the City of Columbus not Grandview Heights. There are renderings of the project in the Olentangy River Road thread.
  4. I drove past this the other day and got curious and now these comments made me go investigate. They do not have permits to built the tower and their site plan hasn’t been approved yet. They got permits to do interior demolition and stabilize the walls that will be saved.
  5. Actually, if you're referring to the projects mentioned in the above article, they're in Franklinton. To be exact, they're in the East Franklinton District, which isn't a part of the Downtown District. The map above shows the extent of the East Franklinton District. The Scioto Peninsula to the east is part of the Downtown District. All the projects in the above article are within this area. If the article referred to redevelopment of the area around COSI as Franklinton then they'd be wrong.
  6. I'm looking for a new place and called Gravity because I thought it would be cool to live there and be close to work Downtown. Despite it looking very finished on the exterior it is going to be ready for occupancy in March so they directed me to 80 on the Commons which has had people living in it for months. I didn't think it was occupied yet because I eat at the food trucks in Columbus Commons every so often and it looks like there's still a lot of work left to do on the building. Apparently not. I went over to look at the units and took some pictures. They're very expensive, $1,200 for 490 SQ FT studios, $1,450+ for the smaller 1 bedrooms. I don't want to know what they're charging for 2 bedrooms. I don't think I'll end up moving because it's a hassle, however if I was I'd pick this building. Out of all the new buildings I've seen in Columbus after looking at places before moving here and during the Urban Living tour, this is far and beyond the most well built and solid feeling new building in the city. The units feel sound proof and air tight when you close the door and there weren't any visible signs of short cuts and sloppiness in the finishes. That bus terminal needs to go. Some views from 250 S High:
  7. Drove by on my way home from work and the site is fenced off with no cars in the parking lot.
  8. The Pizzuti office building at 1st & High went up quickly... More glass on the Moxy Hotel.
  9. They're starting the cladding soon you can see the panels they're going to attach it to being installed between two windows. Can't wait to see how red this is.
  10. They applied for their building permit two days ago so they’ll probably break ground in the spring unless it gets approved unusually quickly.
  11. North of Nordstrom will be another parking garage. The grey to the east of that garage will not necessarily be a garage. I think the aqua colored developments are mixed use. Red is offices. The purple shows the Aloft hotel and a building that should be apartments to the south. I'm guessing this color indicates residential and hotel uses. Everything shown in yellow will be retail / restaurant spaces. All of this is currently working through the approval process with the city, and the site work is already well underway.
  12. Does anyone know what is being built directly to the north of where all the single family and town homes have been built so far in Grandview Yard? I was there the other day and there's a bunch of utility work and streets and alleys laid out. I'm guessing it's probably more of the same but it would be nice to know exactly what is going on.
  13. There are so many creative solutions they could be using to gain more light or align the floor plates. In Amsterdam there was an existing historic structure that was too short to be used for this Chanel boutique. They took apart the old structure and rebuilt it taller to fit todays needs. The diagram below better explains what they did than I can. This building in Toronto uses a perforated metal screen to replicate the old facade of the building that was here and burnt down. Everything behind the screen is glass so the new building gained a lot of natural light. The two above examples show two creative options that could solve their problem at this site, but they're not willing to think outside the box. They could even take the elevator and stairs out of the Madison building and put them where the smaller building is now to gain more floor space. They could keep the facade and install a light well or multiple skylights or frosted glass floor plates. There are literally so many things they could do. Tearing the smaller building down is the laziest and least creative option. What's worse is the Commissioners are willing to entertain it if the alley is good enough. No alley is going to be good enough on a block that already has way too much undeveloped land. If the hotel was going to be developed with something nice I'd maybe be willing to let this slide but there's no momentum on that project as far as I know. They've had control of the land for so many years it seems suspicious that after all this time, and even showing this building in the rendering in last months Downtown Commission hearing that they all of a sudden need to tear it down to make the project work. They're only tearing it down because it's quick and easy. If that tenant falls through or moves out tearing out the structure will be all for nothing and that parcel is too small for something to pencil out there in the future with today's development costs.
  14. I like the look of the retail portion of the garage, but the entire Long Street frontage of it should be retail, not just the corner.
×