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DEPACincy

Huntington Tower 330'
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  1. DEPACincy

    The Trump Presidency

    It's statements like this that show your true stripes.
  2. DEPACincy

    The Trump Presidency

    I'm confused by this statement. What angst? Every American supposedly feels angst? The only angst I feel is over what Trump is doing to this country. I had no angst before. As a conservative have you been told repeatedly that you are a bigot for simply being a conservative? Seriously interested in hearing about it, if so. I have conservative friends. I've never accused them of being a bigot for simply being conservative. It sounds to me like he's thin-skinned and can't stand having his beliefs challenged. Did he elaborate on this? What kind of radical change do we need that Trump's policies address? I would say our biggest problems are inequality and climate change, and Trump's policies make both of these way worse. Did you ask him what he thinks this has done to stability in the world? Not only has our standing been eroded, but his rhetoric has created instability across the entire globe. Surely this is a bigger concern than any domestic issue we could be grappling with?
  3. DEPACincy

    The Trump Presidency

    I honestly can't think of another word to describe someone who is up in arms about Colin Kaepernick kneeling but has no problem with Trump insulting the Navy Seal who took down Bin Laden. I know people with advanced degrees from Ivy League schools that are dumb. It's possible.
  4. I agree that their rejection of a rail system is a flaw in my point. But I feel like it's more the exception that proves the rule. I was surprised to see that happen and I think a lot of other people were too. Also, I don't think I made my point about downtown very well. I'm not arguing that Cincinnati's use of Central Business District as the official name for downtown is the reason that Cincinnati hasn't seen the success other cities have. That would be silly. Rather, I think the fact that it is still called that (and yes, people in government and the business community do call it that), is symbolic of the kind of "old school" thinking you find in Cincy. To those in power in Cincy, downtown has always been a place for Business, not a place for living or visiting. That's starting to change but it's been painfully slow. When I say I live downtown people say "Oh, OTR?" and when I tell them that no I live in actual downtown they give me a funny look. It's just one tiny thing, but I think it speaks to a mindset here.
  5. DEPACincy

    Voting

    You keep acting like you're the only person who understands the Senate. We all understand the concept. It isn't complicated. What I asked you is if you think there is a point where so much of the population of the country is concentrated in a few states that the Senate needs to change. Do you think that if, one day, the country has 98% of its population concentrated in one state that the Senate will still be a legitimate and useful institution? If not, then how high is your threshold for when you think it would need to change?
  6. In my mind, it boils down to two things (though I'm sure there are more): 1. Nashville embraced its funky image and went whole hog on tourism as a driver. This put them on the map and attracted outside investment. At the same time, Cincinnati was kvetching about whether flying pigs would make them look silly. 2. Despite being in a red state, Nashville and Davidson County have fully embraced progressive policies for a long time now. They've went bold and big with public projects and they've done everything they can to make the city welcoming and desirable. Cincinnati, on the other hand, was until 2004 the only city in the nation whose charter expressly barred ordinances related to gay rights. Local politics, while moving left, have historically been dominated by groups like COAST which oppose taxes at all cost and fight to shut down any ambitious public projects. Just look at the Kansas City streetcar vs. the Cincinnati one. One of them has a local government that has worked to make it reliable, convenient, and free. The other is Cincinnati. Even the name of our Downtown is off-putting to anyone that might want to spend time here. Philly has Center City. Chicago has The Loop. Nashville has SoBro. Cincinnati has the Central Business District.
  7. DEPACincy

    Voting

    I feel like you're being intentionally thick. My point is that the founders were okay with the Senate not being proportional because the proportions were not as extreme. Using your logic, where do we draw the line? If in 100 years, because of some fluke of history, 90% of the population lives in NYC, do we still give every state 2 Senators? Do we let 10% of the population choose 98% of the Senate? At what point do you admit that equal representation for states no longer makes sense? Honest question. No it wasn't. California and Wyoming didn't exist. Which is exactly my point!
  8. DEPACincy

    The Democratic Party

    That's not true. Every state that has undertaken gerrymandering reform has come up with standards that are a combination of compactness and representation. It hasn't been particularly contentious. There's no big debate about which one needs to win out. And you said several things that were directly false: There are not wildly different ideas. As I stated, a proportionally representative map and a compact map both end up being very similar. And both are nothing like what we have today. No. If you prioritize both you get a map that is much more compact and representative than the status quo. Another false statement. Competitive districts would have less tentacles than our current map in Ohio. Right now each of the 3Cs has tentacles emanating out from it. 538's map that prioritizes competitive districts keeps only one tentacle in Cleveland and has more compact districts for every urban area.
  9. DEPACincy

    Voting

    Right. But they thought it was a good idea, in the sense that they were willing to concede it to get the union together. I don't think anyone would agree to the Senate today, because the population disparity is so much larger.
  10. DEPACincy

    Voting

    What is comical is arguing that the founders would think the Senate is a good idea today because they thought so over 200 years ago. In 1790, the largest state (Virginia) had a population of 747,610. The smallest state (Delaware) had a population of 59,094. That means the largest state had 12.65 times as many people as the smallest. That includes all slaves too. If you counted them as 3/5ths of a person the ratio would be smaller. No city had a larger population than the smallest state. Today, the largest state has more than 66 times as many people as the smallest. There are now 31 cities and 98 metro areas with a larger population than Wyoming. The world is a very different place and the discussion would be different if the founders were devising a system today. It blows my mind that anyone could argue otherwise.
  11. DEPACincy

    The Democratic Party

    There's no reason to keep arguing this because I've already presented evidence that you're wrong twice, but I'll do it again. A map that only prioritized compactness and following county borders in Ohio would yield 2 Democratic seats, 6 Republican seats, and 8 competitive districts. A map that only prioritized competitive districts it would yield 1 Democratic seat, 4 Republican seats, and 11 competitive districts. The current map has 4 Democratic seats, 10 Republican seats, and only 2 competitive districts. So either way, you get a map that is more competitive and more reflective of the electorate and less gerrymandered. We don't have to argue in hypotheticals here because 538 already did the legwork. https://projects.fivethirtyeight.com/redistricting-maps/ohio/#Compact
  12. DEPACincy

    Electric Scooter Sharing

    This is just silly. I can't even argue with that because it's so absurd. Again, go to any city with substantial bike infrastructure and they are more popular than ever. We've had this discussion before, but I am literally this person. I never rode a bike for transportation before Philly started their bike share program. Riding those bikes made me realize how convenient it is, but also that the bikes themselves were not really good for long trips. So I bought a bike I could use for longer trips and trail rides and I still used the bike share system for short trips. It was great because Philly has great bike infrastructure, and despite being a city with over five times the population of Cincinnati and much more traffic (and crazier drivers) I felt much safer on Philly streets than I do on Cincinnati streets.
  13. DEPACincy

    Electric Scooter Sharing

    I still don't get your point Jake. Companies like Bird are already advocating for bike lanes and even offering to pay for them because they know the proliferation of bike infrastructure also benefits them. The bike advocates don't see the mobility companies as an enemy, but a valuable partner. Scooters and bikes can co-exist and will co-exist. Call it a mobility lane if you want, but the outcome is the same. And btw, Bird specifically calls them bike lanes, so they obviously don't see their product as adversarial to bikes. https://usa.streetsblog.org/2018/08/02/scooter-company-bird-offers-to-pay-cities-to-build-bike-lanes/
  14. DEPACincy

    Electric Scooter Sharing

    Exactly. And I'd add that by Jake's logic any and all safety improvements to any infrastructure are unneeded. You can always say people should just be more careful. We discovered roundabouts and other techniques to eliminate left turns are superior because they are much safer. But I could easily say that people should just be more careful when they make a left turn. But that doesn't solve the problem. The evidence is there that cities that invest in cycling infrastructure to make it safe and effective see an increase in cycling. It's not rocket science.
  15. DEPACincy

    The Trump Presidency

    Here you go with the intellectual dishonesty again. You know damn well that it is possible to believe that Sessions is a racist, bigoted, piece of crap and also believe that Trump's move here is motivated by his own desire to have more control over the Mueller investigation. You're just spewing out the Hannity/Limbaugh/Breitbart talking points.
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