Jump to content

AmrapinVA

Members
  • Content Count

    342
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

0 Neutral
  1. I'm happy this is happening but I hope they use a better quality concrete compared to what they used to make Parma's sidewalks ADA compliant recently. The new curbs are crumbling pretty quickly.
  2. AmrapinVA

    The "Generation Gap"

    Not a Boomer but I disagree about them not being aware of freebies. Their parents were the WWII/Depression generation. Their grandparents made the difficult transitions into a modern society or were part of the massive immigrant wave into this country. I'm sure stories were told to them of how good they have it. I know my grandparents had fascinating stories of difficulty. Western Millennials, OTOH, haven't really had a difficult road. Non-first world Millennials are a very different story. This is the most-wrong post I've ever seen on Urban Ohio and that says a lot. Boomers, both those on the national stage and those I know personally, are always going on and on about how easy millennials have it (see your second paragraph) and how hard they had it. "I worked my way through college and bought a house at 22" is such a common refrain it's become a cultural meme. Boomers don't put a second thought to the fact that college costs have inflated to the moon, and the minimum wage is lower now than it was in the 1960s. At the same time, they've left us crumbling infrastructure, underfunded schools, a warming planet---the list goes on and on. Because of the actions of the Boomers, Millennials and Gen Z will have a far worse life than their parents and grandparents. Western Boomers and Gen Xers have it easy too. Don't get me wrong. This being said: -- Have you had to leave your family in your home country at a young age because it offers no educational opportunities or employment? -- Have you travelled through countries illegally on foot and in disguise to get to a country with opportunities? -- When in this country do you work knowing at any moment you may be removed because you're not a permanent resident based on the idiotic actions of the host or your home government? -- Do you know your birthday and who your parents are? I work with a lot people who have truly called through global sh*t to get clean on the other side. So I am a little jaded to complaints of Western Millennials being dealt the worst hand of humanity ever. Just my wrong opinion, I guess. ;D Maybe I misunderstood your first post, but I feel like your second one is talking about something completely different. Yes, Millennials and Gen Z have it bad by modern American standards, and certainly worse than their parents and grandparents. Are there places in the world where their life would be immeasurably worse? Of course! I would never deny that. But the actions of Boomers have made the lives of their progeny worse. Also, to your points. I have not had to leave my home country at a young age, but I did have to leave my region because of a lack of educational and employment opportunities. Appalachian Ohio is worse off today than at any point in the second half of the 20th Century and living conditions mirror those in many developing countries. So I had to move 500 miles from my parents to find opportunity. Luckily, I'm now back in Ohio and closer to family--but there is still zero economic or educational opportunity for many kids in Appalachia. Similarly, I have not ever had to worry about being removed from this country but I know many Millennials who worry about that every day. Our government is intent on punishing these people for trying to come here and make a better life for themselves, even though many of them came as small children. I also know my birthday and who my parents are, but again, there are many, many children in this country that do not. I get your point, that life in this country is better than in many countries around the world. But our quality of life used to be near the top, and now we are painfully middling. You're thinking nationally, I'm thinking globally. I think it's our disconnect. I wasn't going to respond until you said my post was the worst ever! ;)
  3. AmrapinVA

    The "Generation Gap"

    The Chinese are only "better" because GenXer activists were slaughtered en masse at Tiananmen Square and there now seems to be global amnesia of this event due to China mining all the important things for a smartphone to work. Now a Ponzi scheme is in place to keep everyone "happy". Their Boomers were under the thumb Chairman Mao. So that's an astoundingly low standard to start from as an example, IMHO. Why would we not be talking about global generations? We're human first, everything else second.
  4. AmrapinVA

    The "Generation Gap"

    Not a Boomer but I disagree about them not being aware of freebies. Their parents were the WWII/Depression generation. Their grandparents made the difficult transitions into a modern society or were part of the massive immigrant wave into this country. I'm sure stories were told to them of how good they have it. I know my grandparents had fascinating stories of difficulty. Western Millennials, OTOH, haven't really had a difficult road. Non-first world Millennials are a very different story. This is the most-wrong post I've ever seen on Urban Ohio and that says a lot. Boomers, both those on the national stage and those I know personally, are always going on and on about how easy millennials have it (see your second paragraph) and how hard they had it. "I worked my way through college and bought a house at 22" is such a common refrain it's become a cultural meme. Boomers don't put a second thought to the fact that college costs have inflated to the moon, and the minimum wage is lower now than it was in the 1960s. At the same time, they've left us crumbling infrastructure, underfunded schools, a warming planet---the list goes on and on. Because of the actions of the Boomers, Millennials and Gen Z will have a far worse life than their parents and grandparents. Western Boomers and Gen Xers have it easy too. Don't get me wrong. This being said: -- Have you had to leave your family in your home country at a young age because it offers no educational opportunities or employment? -- Have you travelled through countries illegally on foot and in disguise to get to a country with opportunities? -- When in this country do you work knowing at any moment you may be removed because you're not a permanent resident based on the idiotic actions of the host or your home government? -- Do you know your birthday and who your parents are? I work with a lot people who have truly called through global sh*t to get clean on the other side. So I am a little jaded to complaints of Western Millennials being dealt the worst hand of humanity ever. Just my wrong opinion, I guess. ;D
  5. AmrapinVA

    The "Generation Gap"

    Not a Boomer but I disagree about them not being aware of freebies. Their parents were the WWII/Depression generation. Their grandparents made the difficult transitions into a modern society or were part of the massive immigrant wave into this country. I'm sure stories were told to them of how good they have it. I know my grandparents had fascinating stories of difficulty. Western Millennials, OTOH, haven't really had a difficult road. Non-first world Millennials are a very different story.
  6. AmrapinVA

    Ohio Census / Population Trends

    I'm trying to debate with myself if 56 percent is a good or bad percentage. It means 44 percent are not supportive of immigrants. Was this number worse in the past? Or is there a neutral category that would make the non-supportive amount smaller? Why would I move to a community where 4 out of 10 neighbors didn't really want me there?
  7. AmrapinVA

    Ohio Census / Population Trends

    I'm not sure what you're trying to say with this post. Yes, of course Mexico and Puerto Rico are different places....? Maybe I am misunderstanding the point you're trying to make. I know that Cleveland's Latino community skews much more toward the Caribbean than Mexico, and that makes it a bit of an outlier in the Midwest. Cleveland does have a sizable Puerto Rican community, but the total population of Latinos is pretty small. Let's look at some numbers (2010 census data): Cleveland: 10% Latino 2010 population: 396,000 # of Latinos: 39,600 Columbus: 5.6% Hispanic (primary country of origin is Mexico) 2010 population: 787,000 # of Hispanics: 44,072 Cincinnati: 3% Hispanic (Mexico and Central American countries represent the most common countries of origin) 2010 population: 296,000 # of Hispanics: 8,800 (!) Milwaukee 17% Hispanic 2010 population: 594,000 # of Hispanics: 100,980 Indianapolis 10% Hispanic 2010 population: 820,000 # of Hispanics: 82,000 Now, I know that these numbers are almost a decade out of date, and I know enough about demographic trends to realize that many recent immigrants are bypassing urban cores, and living in suburban areas. In Cincinnati's case, the heart of the Hispanic community is in the northern suburbs, and the total community at the metro level is about 60,000 people strong, which isn't insignificant. I don't know if there are any lessons that can be learned from other cities about how to best attract immigrants, but there's no doubt that our cities could use the shot in the arm that immigrants can provide. I'm a bit of a demographics nerd, so I find this stuff endlessly interesting. Cleveland's MSA Hispanic population (without Akron) is almost 100k. Also, Cleveland 'burbs like Lorain and Painesville have plenty of non-PR families. It's not coincidence those cities' populations have stabilized and started growing again. That being said Cleveland and Cincy MSA's Hispanic percentage is below the national average. Ohio's larger cities, to me, are not very immigrant friendly with Columbus being the outlier. Even some denizens of these threads talk about having the "right" immigrants or getting buy-in from existing minorities before letting "outsiders" in. Meh.
  8. AmrapinVA

    Cleveland Browns Discussion

    Between Mayfield, Ward and Chubb this may have been the best draft since the Belichick-era, before the big move. I know it's still early but Dorsey looks to be the real deal at GM.
  9. AmrapinVA

    SCOTUS

    It think it's weird you blow it off. Then again, I think it's more of a local DC issue. I don't really care this much anyway. I blow it off because it's a weird minor thing that only you seem to have picked up on and is unimportant in the scheme of things. Thanks for the opinion.
  10. AmrapinVA

    SCOTUS

    It think it's weird you blow it off. Then again, I think it's more of a local DC issue. I don't really care this much anyway. People are talking about it in this region. It's not pedantry but more of something local, I believe. I'll drop it here.
  11. AmrapinVA

    SCOTUS

    So I go back to may original question: If she's part of the club then why call Georgetown Prep "elitst"? It implies she went somewhere less so which is not true. Or is it that she can recognize "elitist" because she is one as well? Is this the point? Either way, I just think she should have avoided this term here.
  12. AmrapinVA

    SCOTUS

    It's insanely expensive to live in Chevy Chase or Bethesda. This was mostly true even back in the 80s. Prices are partially driven by the public high school - Bethesda/Chevy Chase - being the best non-magnet HS in Montgomery County, MD and partially driven by the proximity to NW DC.
  13. AmrapinVA

    SCOTUS

    I think she was merely describing the school. Elitist could definitely described for her school yet she implies, a bit, he was the only one who went to somewhere with money. I just didn't like it. I didn't get that implication at all. She mentioned how they belonged to the country club. I got the impression that they were both from well off families. OK...I have to admit I only heard part of the testimony on Democracy Now. It's weird my neighbor didn't mention the country club reference. Oh well.
  14. AmrapinVA

    SCOTUS

    I think she was merely describing the school. Elitist could definitely be described for her school yet she implies, a bit, he was the only one who went somewhere with "money". I just didn't like it and it was weird. I know it turned a lot of locals off.
  15. AmrapinVA

    SCOTUS

    Dr. Ford called Georgetown Prep an "elitist boys school" yet she went to Holton Arms. Was she trying to say she was poor there? All these people came from very big money. I didn't understand the argument there.
×