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Rustbelter

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  1. Having boat docks would be cool, but this "moat" concept is bizarre, blocks off public access, and it seams like it would be very expensive. I think a better configuration would be to build canal slips with condos around them similar to these: https://www.google.com/maps/@55.7279358,12.5816206,3a,75y,92.73h,79.93t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sPVfb6I-lxjxrggK7S7A8NA!2e0!7i13312!8i6656 https://www.google.com/maps/@55.7253144,12.5810488,3a,60y,88.63h,90.91t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1s-OnBXj9HU7z-kPj2dGa8kw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656
  2. Development on that site would certainly be welcome, but that plan looks bizarre to me. What's up with twin highrise building with the moat? And why have a big surface lot in the middle? Tearing down the Harbor Inn and Nautica Lofts (a perfectly good building) is not ideal either. I hope this is reworked.
  3. Rustbelter

    Hipsters

    I must be getting old because I don't understand what this normcore stuff is all about. Is it the new outfit for counterculter types (what we have referred to as hipsters over the last decade)? Or is it a backlash to counterculter? What is involved with normcore aside from dressing like you're straight out of the late 80s? Is there normcore music? Also, not sure I agree with your take on Levis. Tight Levis have been heavily worn by hipsters for a while. There is actually a Carhartt store in Wicker Park in Chicago, and it's sold as a fashion brand in European cities. http://www.carhartt-wip.com/stores/5823 There are lots of hipsters in Logan Square. Just a short time ago Wicker Park was a good blend of hipsters and yuppies, but over the last few years the hipsters have moved en masse to Logan Square. Logan Square is the hottest neighborhood in Chicago now, with tons of new business opening and new construction about to take off. http://chicago.curbed.com/archives/2015/10/27/logan-square-permits.php http://chicago.curbed.com/archives/2014/10/28/mapping-milwaukee-avenues-development-boom.php In no time the hipsters will be priced out of Logan Square and take over Avondale. You also see hipsters in Chicago in Ukrainian Village, Humboldt Park, and Pilsen. Wicker Park is pretty much yuppie now with some leftover hipster elements, but is not in the frat bro style of the north side lakefront (the bros have made their inroads though). Was in Brooklyn last summer it it appears there were tons hipsters there, so I don't see much change in the fad for now. Just maybe a differing style http://cdn.pastemagazine.com/www/articles/2012/11/02/evolution-hipster.jpg http://cdn.pastemagazine.com/www/articles/Evolution-of-a-Hipster_FINAL2015.jpg
  4. we have Fairport :-) http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php/topic,27516.0.html OK, missed that thread. No photos of it on the site gallery though.
  5. Rustbelter

    Hipsters

    My impression of Boston is that is has a lot of bro/frat types similar to Chicago's North Side. I also think in has a lot of Irish/Italian meathead types that are kind of like a Boston version of a guido (Chicago does not really have this). I don't get the impression that Boston is very hipster, except for some culture that goes along with the the MIT & Harvard nerd culture.
  6. I would put a new red line stop at W. 85th & Franklin. The industrial areas around it along Madison and Detroit could be developed as TOD residential/mixed use. This station would be in walking distance to two commercial streets, and would also help revitalize the sketchy area that currently exists between Gordon Square and Edgewater/Lakewood.
  7. Yeah, looks like a courtyard concept. That style is all over Chicago (usually in the form of an apartment building). Looks OK to me.
  8. Yes, obviously Cleveland has better transit than Milwaukee. Not sure how you can say that about land-use patterns, as that pretty much gets back to Milwaukee's lakefront planning. Also, there are sections of the river in Milwaukee that slope down just like the flats, albeit on a smaller scale. These areas are not in the heart of downtown but are just north of it; and are former industrial ares that are now residential. Here is the area I'm talking about. I think it would be a good example for the flats. https://maps.google.com/maps?ll=43.057679,-87.899133&spn=0.002627,0.004442&t=h&z=18&layer=c&cbll=43.057724,-87.90003&panoid=9S2KEVaDdrqal5s36emldA&cbp=12,77.75,,0,3.5 https://maps.google.com/maps?ll=43.053877,-87.905678&spn=0.003716,0.008883&t=h&z=17&layer=c&cbll=43.053874,-87.907713&panoid=k-XTad4h9DzDzIlQEtkLNA&cbp=12,186.01,,0,2.08 And here is another section of Milwaukee that has been developed where there are less slopes, but still a good example to look at. https://maps.google.com/maps?ll=43.031208,-87.907931&spn=0.003717,0.008883&t=h&z=17&layer=c&cbll=43.031207,-87.909973&panoid=ri32uxNoOeH4ZLhUwkFuDA&cbp=12,102.8,,0,-1.19 I think Cleveland still has a ways to catch up to Milwaukee when it comes to riverfront development. It's because of Ohio State's student housing and adjacent neighborhoods I think.
  9. Rustbelter

    Bros

    I don't fit either myself, so was wondering the same. Having lived in major hipster neighborhoods and bro neighborhoods, I can say that bros annoy me more than hipsters. At least hipsters generally have a broader range of interests and don't act like meatheads. Although, occasionally a pretentious hipster douche will surface. Or the hipster who is just trying way too hard to be "original."
  10. Rustbelter

    Bros

    Yeah, I agree they're not what is now considered a "bro" by most. However, this is what these types were called when I lived in San Diego. It's very specific to SoCal and I see how it would create confusion.
  11. As Murray Hill mentioned there is a lot Cleveland can learn from Portland as far as urban development, but I also agree that Milwaukee is a good city to look too for ideas. Cleveland has a lot more in common with Milwaukee than it does Portland. Milwaukee has done a good job of redeveloping it's former industrial riverfront with residential development and it has a great lakefront that is on the same scale as Cleveland's. Of course Milwaukee did a better job than Cleveland from the get-go as far as urban planning goes. Milwaukee has always had a lakefront that is parkland in the heart of the city, and has always had nice neighborhoods along that lakefront near the downtown.
  12. Rustbelter

    Hipsters

    I think the hipster is different than the 80s & 90s bohemians. The 80s & 90s bohemians had their own groups and were a product of something original (e.g. goths, college rocker, ravers, punks). The hipster has just taken all the avant garde or "authetic" ideas of past generations and molded into their persona. Nothing really original has been created from the hipster movement. Metal heads, at least in their original form, I think were pretty different than hipsters (aside from bad hair and tight jeans). I see metal heads as more macho and blue collar. Hipsters seem passive and pseudo-intellectual.
  13. Rustbelter

    Bros

    This is the truth for sure! And the term Trixie is a Chicago term. One "bro" label not considered is one that I heard when living in San Diego. Although, this version of bro is not much like the others and is kind of like a blue-collar SoCal redneck meets skater punk. I have only seen this type of bro in SoCal and Vegas, but they used to be pretty common there. Not sure how big this scene still is though.This version of bro is also called a flatbiller by some. http://www.flatbiller.com/
  14. This is true. LA actually has some pretty good density. However, its problem IMO is that this density is not continuous and is spotty. There are sections of LA that have dense housing blocks next to neighborhoods with suburban ranch houses. Another problem with LA is the commercial corridors are spread out far apart and are auto-centric, which is not accommodating for pedestrians. I think SF has those buses due to the fact that SF's transit system is poor given the urban character of the city. You also have a lot of high tech job sprawl there combined with workers who want the urban core. Like I said before, I don't agree that LA has good continuous density (at least in built form). Although, with LA it's because it was built that way. With the rust belt it's because neighborhoods have declined. Madison and Milwaukee have very pedestrian friendly cores. I have visited Milwaukee without driving, and just getting around by bus and walking. Milwaukee actually has a great core of neighborhoods and it clearly has less "missing teeth" than Cleveland does. There are nice residential areas of Milwaukee with densities in the 20,000 to 30,000 range. Milwaukee is actually a very underrated city. I think it would be a good candidate for a streetcar in the core of the city to link those core neighborhoods. I agree, but unfortunately it has not translated except for Shaker Square. Little Italy is also getting a new transit stop in the center of the neighborhood, which I think will drive some TOD. Ohio City should be the real TOD target for Cleveland. This neighborhood should have a density of at least 30,000 in my mind, and I believe right now it probably has 1/3 that. There is lots of room in Ohio City for modern row-house development and mid-rise buildings along the commercial corridors.
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