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Columbus: Italian Village Developments and News

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From Columbus RetroMetro, 7/12/05:

 

 

Kramer Paints Condo Project Gets Green Light

 

News from the Italian Village Society meeting that was held tonight:

 

The 40 plus unit condo project slated for development across the street from Jeffrey Place on the former Kramer Paints site on 4th Street just below East First Avenue has received conceptual approval from the Italian Village Commission. The project is now moving to apply for zoning variances and construction permits.

 

The project had to go through a few revisions to deal with neighbors concerns regarding parking issues and traffic that would be created on the alley behind the project. The project is slated to be condos with some retail space on the first floor.

 

http://columbusretrometro.typepad.com/columbus_retrometro/2005/07/kramer_paints_c.html

 

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Blend of public, private housing a winning mix for development

Saturday, October 28, 2006

Debbie Gebolys

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Trendy, brightly colored and well-tended, 37 buildings in Italian Village are designed to appeal to young professionals who are drawn to the Short North. The one-, two- and threebedroom town house apartments hold their own against the newest offerings in the Arena District and Brewery District. Since New Village Place opened two years ago, there have been almost no vacancies among the 100 units. 

 

dgebolys@dispatch.com

http://dispatch.com/news-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/10/28/20061028-C1-02.html

 

 

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Guest is executive director of the Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authority, whose experimental New Village combines market-rate town homes and public housing, without telling either group of renters about the other.

 

I'll bet the non market-rate crowd is easy to spot.

 

Hint: kids.

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Nothing remarkable.  It was just your basic 1960's-70's public housing high-rise. No loss to the neighborhood. There is a lot of really good looking in-fill housing happening around there now.

 

 

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I figured this one would win. The impact it has on the city is bigger than the other contenders and is a local example of successful mixed-income housing that will hopefully be followed by other developers in poorer areas that have an influx of higher-income people.

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What gets me is that they've figured out how to do a great mixed-income project in Italian Village, but less than a mile to the south in Downtown Columbus, virtually every new residential project is way beyond the means of all but the corporate execs and the otherwise well-heeled.

 

:?

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CONSTRUCTION ZONE

$1 million fundraising effort begins to rebuild Italian Village Park

Monday, November 27, 2006

Mike Pramik THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

A dilapidated park in the Short North could be turned into a showpiece if a nonprofit group’s fundraising effort is successful.  The Italian Village Society is attempting to raise nearly $1 million to rebuild its Italian Village Park at High and Hubbard streets. The changes would include a central lawn and a better-defined entrance to the park from High Street.

 

One part of the plan, designed by local architecture firm MSI, is to move a small playground from the corner of Kerr and Hubbard streets to the southwestern section of the park along High Street.  It would allow for what Phillips calls an oval "great lawn" to be created in the middle of the park.  The plan also includes removing broken concrete, regrading and resodding the lot, building flower beds and installing benches and other furniture. A pavilion is part of the design.

 

 

Read more at http://www.columbusdispatch.com/business-story.php?story=dispatch/2006/11/27/20061127-B6-01.html

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Kramer Place Apartments

Columbus RetroMetro

Posted by Paul Bonneville on March 6, 2008

 

As with a number of condominium developments in the downtown area that have taken a rental approach, the former Kramer Place Condominiums are now being offered as apartments.

 

One bedroom apartments start at $800 and two bedrooms start at $1250.

 

Coming from someone who lives about 2 blocks away, I can say firsthand that this neighborhood is a PRIME location for living a lifestyle with the best that Columbus has to offer in the way of restaurants and entertainment...but then again, I'm biased.

 

http://columbusretrometro.typepad.com/columbus_retrometro/2008/03/kramer-place-ap.html

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Wonder Bread plant closing

Business First of Columbus

Tuesday, March 10, 2009, 4:32pm

 

Fresh off its emergence from Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, the parent of Columbus’ Wonder Bread plant said the downtown-area facility will be one of two closing in May.  Kansas City, Mo.-based Interstate Bakeries Corp. said Tuesday that production at the Columbus plant will end by May 9.  Spokeswoman Maya Pogoda said 70 bakery workers and 17 drivers and other employees with jobs tied to the plant will be cut.

 

News of the pending closure comes a month after Interstate cut 38 workers at the Columbus plant, which makes hot dog buns and rolls, as it rolled out a new all-natural bread brand that the facility couldn’t bake.  Days before that announcement, Interstate emerged from more than four years of Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

 

Read more at http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2009/03/09/daily18.html

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Wonder Bread bakery in Columbus to close in May

About 70 workers will lose their jobs

Tuesday,  March 10, 2009 12:49 PM

By Dan Gearino

THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

Interstate Bakeries Corp. plans to close its Columbus Wonder Bread plant, the company said today.  The bakery, 697 N. 4th St., will shut down on May 9 after nearly a century at that location.  All of the roughly 70 employees will lose their jobs.

 

The Wonder Bread sign on top of the bakery is a notable feature of the Italian Village neighborhood, visible from I-670.  According to county records, the plant was built in 1916.

 

Full article at http://columbusdispatch.com/live/content/local_news/stories/2009/03/10/abread.html?sid=101

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And there goes that wonderful aroma of baking bread along with more jobs....

 

Wonder Bread bakery to close

About 70 employees will lose their jobs; latest move follows round of cutbacks made last month

Wednesday,  March 11, 2009 3:09 AM

By Dan Gearino  THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

 

After nearly a century of operation, the Columbus Wonder Bread plant will close in early May, putting about 70 employees out of work.  Last month, plant owner Interstate Bakeries Corp. cut 38 jobs in Columbus and moved the work to the Chicago area.  The Wonder Bread sign on top of the bakery is a notable feature of the Italian Village neighborhood, visible from I-670. According to county records, the plant was built in 1916.  The bakery, 697 N. 4th St., has gradually reduced its output to the point that it only makes buns for hamburgers and hot dogs. The company said the plant's last day of operation will be May 9.

 

Read more at http://dispatch.com/live/content/business/stories/2009/03/11/wonder_bread_close.ART_ART_03-11-09_C8_QHD6BNI.html?sid=101

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There's a lively discussion here at Columbus Underground.  The discussion partly devolved into Wonder Bread being attacked as a proxy for over-processed unhealthy foods.   

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Also there's a lively discussion here at Columbus Underground.  There the discussion partly devolved into Wonder Bread being attacked as a proxy for over-processed unhealthy foods. 

 

Heaven forfend! Seriously, though, my feelings about the actual Wonderbread product aside, any loss of industrial jobs is bad, but I see this as a potential double loss for Italian Village; what are the chances this plant will be rehabbed into more upscale condos? Pretty darn good. I'm not anti-development, but anything that further contributes to IV's descent in to a boutique bedroom community is definitely a bad thing.

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The Wonder Bread plant is closing??? Noooo!!!  No longer will that wonderful aroma waft throughout Italian Village :( 

 

Ahh!  The smell of fresh baked bread!

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There was already a large scale development underway in IV when I moved away a couple years ago... I believe it was called Jefferson Commons.  I thought that stalled and currently sits as a large amount of vacant land.  If that's the case, I have a hard time picturing a developer thinking redeveloping the Wonder Bread factory into residential is a lucrative idea.  If anything, it's just going to sit vacant for a very long time I'd imagine.  I hope I'm wrong though....

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For my part, if the plant can't be re-purposed for an another industrial function, I'd love to see it converted into an artists' colony. It would do wonders to staunch the outflow of the so-called creative class precipitated by the incredible uptick in neighborhood property values.

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Also there's a lively discussion here at Columbus Underground. There the discussion partly devolved into Wonder Bread being attacked as a proxy for over-processed unhealthy foods.

 

Heaven forfend! Seriously, though, my feelings about the actual Wonderbread product aside, any loss of industrial jobs is bad, but I see this as a potential double loss for Italian Village; what are the chances this plant will be rehabbed into more upscale condos? Pretty darn good. I'm not anti-development, but anything that further contributes to IV's descent in to a boutique bedroom community is definitely a bad thing.

 

That seems an odd thing to hear you to say.  Wouldn't you have to include your own presence in the neighborhood as a bad thing then?  It's similar to hearing suburbanites complain that the "rural character" around their subdivision is being eroded when another subdivision gets developed nearby.

 

I'm not saying your presence in the neighborhood is a bad thing.  I'm sure you're a good neighbor.

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I'm very much in the minority in today's Italian Village; I have two children with a stay at home mom. If not for the reasonable rent and support of our landlords we'd never be able to afford to live in the neighborhood--at $200,000 and up (and up) home ownership is an impossibility. The new developments are geared toward childless professionals and wealthy emptynesters, and based on pungent personal experience, I can say that the neighborhood associations are indifferent-to-hostile to the needs of families and small businesses.

 

What I'm saying is we need a mix of people and functions in the neighborhood. The recipe in play right now precludes that.

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I see your point, but I would bet their are ways of slicing and dicing neighborhood demographics to place you into the "intruder group".  I see it as inherently unsavory ground to tread when we start that process.

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It's probably trite to say "I feel your pain" Kingfish, but...I do.  The "G" word is a touchy subject in urban redevelopment.  And by "G", I mean gentrification.  There's strong feelings on all sides of the issue.  And neighborhoods evolve and change all the time.

 

One rule of thumb in Columbus has been:

1) The hip young couple without children lives in (German/Victorian/Italian) Village.

2) The hip young couple with children moves to Clintonville.

 

But you are right about the desire for diversity, Kingfish.  If it was easy to revitalize a neighborhood without some degree of gentrification, it would happen all the time. 

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Wonder Bread plant’s owner hoping buyer interest rises

Business First of Columbus - by Brian R. Ball

Friday, May 29, 2009

 

With no more rolls coming out of the ovens at the Wonder Bread plant, the facility’s owner is looking for an investor to buy the 90-year-old landmark near downtown Columbus.  But the lack of progress at another industrial redevelopment site across North Fourth Street and the poor economic climate could limit interest in the two-level, 64,400-square-foot building, real estate experts said.

 

Kansas City, Mo.-based Interstate Bakeries Corp. closed the plant at 697 N. Fourth St. on May 6 as it shifted production to other Wonder Bread bakeries.  That decision, which eliminated nearly 90 jobs and ended the smell of fresh-baked bread that once wafted from the plant, followed a four-year reorganization of the company in U.S. Bankruptcy Court.  Interstate put the property on the market for $1.7 million.

 

Read more at http://columbus.bizjournals.com/columbus/stories/2009/06/01/story2.html

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Hmmm. This sounds interesting.

 

From Columbus Underground at http://www.columbusunderground.com/forums/topic/wonderland-columbus

 

Wonderland Columbus?

From their facebook page: "Housed in the former Wonder Bread factory, Wonderland will become a facility providing artists studios, shared coworking space, band rehearsal and recording space, and retail and more to the creative community of Columbus, OH."

 

More at http://www.wonderlandcolumbus.com/

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From http://www.columbusunderground.com/wonder-bread-factory-reborn-as-wonderland

 

Press Release about the Wonder Bread bakery site redevelopment:

 

Artists, Musicians and Small Businesses Team up to Take Over Former Wonder Bread Factory

 

It’s been almost a year since Wonder Bread moved out of their Italian Village bakery on 4th Street near the Short North.  Now, a group of innovative entrepreneurs are looking to turn the 65,000 square foot factory into a hub for the creative class in Columbus and beyond.

 

The project is being called “Wonderland” and it will combine artist studios, shared office space, band rehearsal and recording facilities, venue and performance space, gallery space, and a mix of start-up and established retail all under one roof.  The goal is to provide a resource for artists, musicians, and small businesses to achieve individual success, as well as to establish an icon in Columbus that highlights our outstanding local creative industries to the world.

 

Getting things off the ground are Adam Brouillette (Couchfire Collective), Andrew Dodson (Central City Recording), David Hunegnaw (The Sandbox Columbus), Kevin Lykens (Lykens Companies) and Josh Quinn (Tigertree).  The group is forming a non-profit organization to manage the property, to keep rent costs down and to provide a vehicle to seek donations and grants to encourage growth and job creation within the creative community.  They will each focus on a specific area – arts, music, business, retail – and provide business counseling and information resources for tenants as well as day-to-day management of the property.

 

There will be an informational meeting on January 29th at Junctionview Studios (889 Williams Ave, Grandview Heights) from 6:30pm-9pm for anyone who may be interested.

 

More information can be found online at http://www.WonderlandColumbus.com

 

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WONDER BREAD BUILDING

Creative co-op makes bid for bakery

Wednesday,  January 20, 2010 - 3:05 AM

By Kevin Joy, The Columbus Dispatch

 

A bakery in Italian Village that once produced fresh bread has become the intended kitchen for a radically different recipe: a cooperative venue for artists paired with offices, studios, recording facilities and performance spaces, plus room for grass-roots retailers.  Dubbed "Wonderland," the project would be housed in the former Wonder Bread factory -- which the company closed in May.  The concept is being spearheaded by artists and small-business owners -- including Adam Brouillette, president of the Couchfire Collective, a 10-member group that promotes the arts often through Junctionview Studios in Grandview Heights.

 

A public meeting about the venture is scheduled for 6:30 p.m. Jan. 29 at Junctionview, 889 Williams Ave. -- which Couchfire members have used for exhibits and performances since 2006.  At 64,000 square feet, the Wonder Bread building would ease an eventual transition for Junctionview occupants and events -- with plenty of room to grow.  Junctionview, a 22,000-square-foot multiuse space rented by 60 artists and creative entrepreneurs (with a waiting list of 100-plus tenants), is likely to be bulldozed in 2014, when owner Nationwide Realty Investors plans to make way for the second phase of the Grandview Yard outdoor shopping complex.

 

LOCATION MAP

 

VIEW OF WONDER BREAD BUILDING FROM FOURTH STREET

 

Full article at http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/arts/stories/2010/01/20/1A_WONDERLAND.ART_ART_01-20-10_D1_70GBOU5.html?sid=101

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