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Akron Metro RTA-Commuter Rail

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Interesting.  I'm rather dubious of seeing how Hudson will be connected to this.  Perhaps a separate line that goes from Hudson to the intermodal station. There would need to be some serious track work in the Little Cuyahoga Valley for it to get to the Northside station or for a train leaving the intermodal to hop on the Metro line.  To me, Hudson is an afterthought.

 

I would prefer to see when/if the Cleveland to Pittsburgh line is connected to maybe then consider hooking up either Macedonia and/or Hudson to Akron.

 

The obvious thing to me is Metro should be running the full track in Akron to Canton since this is the core of the system.

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Getting to the Akron intermodal station from Canton isn't going to be easy either because it requires building a new track connection, a bridge over the Little Cuyahoga, acquiring the former Erie-Lackawanna right of way up the hill and some pieces parts of properties that encroach on the former right of way.

 

And these are the commuting markets that have the highest number of daily journey to work trips (intra-county data isn't readily available)....

 

Summit to Cuyahoga: 34,476

Stark to Summit: 21,094

Cuyahoga to Summit: 14,207

Summit to Stark: 7,665

Stark to Cuyahoga: 2,443

Cuyahoga to Stark: 565

 

http://www.noaca.org/CTPPJourney%20to%20Work.pdf

http://www.ci.akron.oh.us/webdocs/AMATS/publications/miscpubs/special%20edition%20newsletter%202003-1%20-%20work%20trip%20census%20info.pdf

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^Those numbers are just work commutes, correct?  I can't find any demographics about UA students and where they live.  Certainly it is several thousand commuting from Stark County.

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True, and the intra-county commuting market is the largest one of all in sheer numbers. But the attractiveness of commuter rail increases with distance. So while the total number of commutes is greatest within Summit County, commuter rail typically attracts only about 10 percent of short-distance (10 miles or less) trips. But when you get above 30 or 40 miles, commuter rail typically attracts 25-50 percent of trips.

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still we're seriously not going to build a commuter rail line because 40 people that bought houses next to railroad tracks don't want a train on the tracks.

 

Ain't America a wonderful place? (sometimes it is; sometimes it isn't)

 

Didn't Silver Lake lose their lawsuit about the proposed dinner train on the Cuy Falls-Hudson segment of the line (i.e. railroads, interstate commerce, and all that)?  And doesn't that apply to any proposed commuter service too?

 

If so, I don't think they have much say anymore, unless they can pull what their mayor did several years ago with the AMATS committee and get the whole project removed off of the AMATS agenda. 

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A source in the Akron-Canton transit area tells me Akron Metro submitted a pre-application for a TIGER II grant to conduct planning for the start-up of commuter rail between Hudson and Akron with a southern terminus in the Goodyear Tech Park off I-76. The source said the geographic area of the planning was limited by Akron Metro's service area which is Summit County. Even so, I'm surprised that the pre-application apparently didn't mention going farther south within the county, such as to the CAK Airport.

 

Guess we'll have to see what the actual application includes when it is submitted in late August.

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Fun.  Sounds like a third potential multi-modal train station in Akron.  That would likely link up with the other North/South CVSR trains and also the potential BRT from there to Summit Mall as well as the circulator buses in the Goodyear HQ/East Gate retail complex.

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Now I'm understanding why the initial commuter rail would terminate at the Goodyear HQ, which I thought was an underutilized site. I didn't realize all this was planned. Although the placement of the buildings makes its pretty auto-centric...

 

http://www.urbanohio.com/forum2/index.php/topic,12530.0.html

 

http://www.siteselection.com/ssinsider/images/pw080103e2.jpg

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To me it seems a little curious and confusing.  It should definitely not be a terminus.  However it makes a highly logical stop especially near where the new hq will go. 

 

Also is it assumed that the train will go directly from Hudson to Goodyear?  You make it sound like an Akron station is en route.  Actually I guess they would have their choice of downtown Akron stations to use coming from Hudson.  To me the obvious one to use would be the Northside since its currently seeing much usage.  However Metro RTA might feel they want to start making their new multi-modal station really multi-modal by actually seeing a train stop there. 

 

So they are thinking to roll in from Hudson and stop in Akron then run in reverse to Goodyear?  Or are they looking to go straight back and forth to Hudson from Goodyear?  It would seem like a DMU would be the likely type of train for this. Certainly the most important piece for Metro to set up would be having a stop at the CAK airport.

 

Do you know if Hudson is being planned for because of the potential of it being a stop on the Cleveland to Pittsburgh route?

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With the shops and the hotels that will be going in this area it would be good to give people the option of rail. But it does need to be a DT Akron to Goodyear connection. The people staying at those will be executives and the likes. Goodyear buys tickets for events in DT for its "special" visitors and a train ride toa show and dinner and train ride back would be pretty neat rather than the ole car and driver or shuttle.

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To me it seems a little curious and confusing.  It should definitely not be a terminus.  However it makes a highly logical stop especially near where the new hq will go. 

 

Also is it assumed that the train will go directly from Hudson to Goodyear?  You make it sound like an Akron station is en route.  Actually I guess they would have their choice of downtown Akron stations to use coming from Hudson.  To me the obvious one to use would be the Northside since its currently seeing much usage.  However Metro RTA might feel they want to start making their new multi-modal station really multi-modal by actually seeing a train stop there. 

 

So they are thinking to roll in from Hudson and stop in Akron then run in reverse to Goodyear?  Or are they looking to go straight back and forth to Hudson from Goodyear?  It would seem like a DMU would be the likely type of train for this. Certainly the most important piece for Metro to set up would be having a stop at the CAK airport.

 

Do you know if Hudson is being planned for because of the potential of it being a stop on the Cleveland to Pittsburgh route?

 

The study will likely determine the routing and the termini.

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In the latest board meeting packet from their January minutes Metro Rta mentions how they need to fairly immediately("Dire") replace a railroad bridge.  Location isn't listed.  I'm presuming that the bridge is south/east of Northside station as CVSR is not mentioned, only that there is freight and passenger traffic that is hampered by this  The cost estimate to replace the bridge this year is $625,000. 

 

http://www.akronmetro.org/SharedFiles/Download.aspx?pageid=44&fileid=157&mid=95

 

Hopefully, AMATS planners will see that the rail line owned by METRO makes a very nice spine to build transportation services off of instead of the very simplistic hub.

 

 

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Thanks. At All Aboard Ohio's Akron local meeting, there will be an opportunity to ask an Akron Metro representative about this bridge project, as well as about commuter rail in the transit agency's upcoming long-range plan.

 

May 10th — Akron local meeting — 6 p.m. — Uncorked Wine Bar, 22 North High Street, Akron, Contact Chris Niekamp at 330-608-2503. There is no cost to attend the meeting, but attendees are encouraged to buy a drink, dessert, etc.

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Audidave, the bridge in question is a short span over the Little Cuyahoga River, next to Market Street in the old Goodyear complex area in East Akron. It's a small deck maybe 5-10 feet above the stream. The bridge has gotten so bad that some of the wooden crossties have fallen into the water. An Akron Metro RTA representative said the bridge could last until 2013 before it needs to be replaced, but the agency will replace it after CVSR's Canton trains stop running for the season Nov. 1.

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Cross-posted from the CVSR thread. Good news from the FTA.......

 

http://fta.dot.gov/documents/FY11_Discretionary_Programs_Combined_by_State.pdf

 

Akron (METRO Regional Transit Authority)

Project:  Akron North-South Corridor Alternatives Analysis

Grant Amount:  $270,000

 

The study seeks to provide public transit service to an under-served area where it is difficult to provide bus service due to uneven terrain and roadway connectivity issues.  The study area includes an eight-mile railway corridor of the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad extending from Merriman Valley through downtown Akron and on to south Akron.  In addition to the railway corridor itself, the primary study area would also include the area within approximately a half mile distance of the corridor on both sides.  Further, important roadway or bus transit services that intersect with, or connect, to the railway corridor would be included in a secondary study area.  The study would evaluate the potential for transit options to expand transportation choices, improve transit connections, and provide job access between three distinct districts within the city of Akron: Merriman Valley, downtown Akron, and south Akron

 

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Cross-posted from the Cleveland: Red Line rail or HealthLine bus rapid transit extension to Euclid thread.....

 

http://allaboardohio.org/2011/10/17/two-new-potential-rail-projects-among-ohio-winners-of-federal-transit-funds/

 

Two new potential rail projects among

Ohio winners of federal transit funds

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — Oct. 17, 2011

Contact:

Ken Prendergast

All Aboard Ohio Executive Director

(216) 288-4883

kenprendergast@allaboardohio.org

 

Improved access to jobs for more Ohioans, including the state’s 1 million people living in households without cars, will result from $12.3 million in Federal Transit Administration (FTA) grants. Two grants will be for planning potential new rail development projects that could build off of existing passenger rail services in Cleveland and Akron (see: http://fta.dot.gov/grants/13094.html).

 

“As long as the State of Ohio refuses to consider passenger rail, be it streetcars, high-speed trains or anything in between, it will be up to regional transit agencies and local governments to take the lead,” said Ken Prendergast, executive director of All Aboard Ohio. “Fortunately they are finding a willing partner in the federal government which recognizes private capital follows public investments no matter if it’s in transit, passenger rail, highways or airports.”

 

FTA grants awarded today include nearly $3.5 million for new natural gas-fueled transit buses to replace older ones in Cincinnati, $368,000 for an improved transit maintenance facility and new bus equipment in Canton, and $1 million for an improved bus transportation asset management system in Columbus.

 

The Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority (GCRTA) won FTA grants to upgrade two transit assets: $3 million to help build a scaled-down version of a more attractive and safer bus transit corridor on Clifton Boulevard in Cleveland and Lakewood; and nearly $3.2 to improve parking areas for buses and cars at transit centers and Rapid rail stations.

 

But two of the most exciting FTA awards for Ohio will start planning for potential new rail projects in Cleveland and Akron:

 

1. GCRTA was awarded $1 million for an alternatives analysis of extending a higher level of transit service to the eastern edge of the Authority's service area, while providing enhanced commuter options to downtown Cleveland/University Circle and promoting redevelopment. The study will examine the potential options for a Red Line rail or HealthLine bus rapid transit extension in Cleveland, East Cleveland and Euclid.

 

2. Akron Metro RTA was awarded $270,000 for an alternatives analysis of improving public transit service in an under-served area where it is difficult to provide bus service due to uneven terrain and roadway connectivity issues. The study area is along an eight-mile railway corridor used by the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad (CVSR) extending from the vicinity of the Valley Business District on Merriman Road southeast through downtown Akron and into the vicinity of the new Goodyear Corporate Campus in South Akron.

 

If these alternatives analyses show that one or more options could meet federal cost-effectiveness criteria, then local officials could select an option to advance to preliminary engineering. If the FTA finds the project would cause no significant environmental impacts, it could award federal funds to pay up to half of the construction costs. The federal planning process typically takes 10 years for a transportation project to go from idea to ribbon-cutting; more time is needed if many properties have to be acquired or buildings demolished.

 

That may not be the case with the Akron project, where the railroad corridor is already owned by the public sector – National Park Service northwest of Howard Street and Akron Metro RTA southeastward. Howard Street is also the address of Ohio’s busiest railroad station, used by about 100,000 passengers per year. Much economic development is occurring at the station in downtown Akron’s Northside district including new housing and shops, plus a hotel is planned.

 

“The Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad is designed to serve the Cuyahoga Valley National Park, not commuters,” Prendergast said. “But people are filling trains and causing economic development at downtown Akron's station. So for Akron Metro to also consider a transit use for those rails outside of the park is a logical next step.”

 

The analysis of extending the Red Line or the HealthLine will generate data and debate. A large number of residents of Northeast Cuyahoga County and Lake County commute into Downtown Cleveland and University Circle – Cuyahoga’s two largest employment districts. University Circle is one of the fastest growing urban employment clusters in the United States today and is not served by any limited access highway. An extended Red Line may offer the fastest commute to University Circle, a traffic-free commute to downtown, and a cross-county, all-weather rail link to Hopkins Airport. However, the HealthLine’s more closely spaced stops would likely give commuters greater access to more of University Circle and to more manufacturing jobs in Euclid.

 

“The stunning job growth in University Circle is a big reason why ridership on the Red Line is growing at 17 percent and on the HealthLine at 13 percent,” said Prendergast. “The continued growth of University Circle depends on public transit and extending transit’s catchment area. Without quality transit reaching out to where more commuters live, University Circle is at risk of drowning in traffic.”

 

END

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I've wondered a couple times in the past whether it would make sense for the CVSR to put a stop near Goodyear's HQ (Either old or new since they go near both.) I don't know how if it would attract a significant ridership, but I'm glad someone is exploring the concept. I would wonder how receptive a tire company would be to rail transit, but I guess we'll see.

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The Goodyear Corporate Campus is more than just Goodyear, though. It also include the retail/town center and the industrial park. The rail line runs through the wording "industrial park" in the graphic below......

 

pw080103e2.jpg

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Is this the correct thread for the news of a study that sounds like its boundaries will be exclusively in the city of Akron?  I'm not picking up a "commuter" vibe from this grant.  My take is that Metro is going to take seriously the idea that they have a rail line that should be able to easily enhance their current services.  Maybe the study does take more than a cursory look at the potential outside of Akron for possible new stations and stops.  Possible new stations- Belden Village and CAK with obviously a stop in Canton.

  Hopefully the next grant that comes out is a dual-grant with SARTA to explore the commuter angle. 

 

  For unknowing UOers, the Merriman Valley is more of an entertainment district with about 30-40 bars and restaurants with less than 5 being national chains.  It has all this without any retail destinations or even large employer.  It straddles the Cuyahoga river and the towpath and is wedged in by Cuyahoga Valley NP and metro parks that surround the valley.  About 5000 people live in this area with probably about 2000+ going to University of Akron or Kent State.  This stands as an obvious instant TOD- just add a railway stop(and a train)..

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It's about an 8 mile corridor from the Merriman Valley to the south side of the city. It may not go all the way to Canton or Cleveland, but if it ends up getting passenger rail that isn't primarily for seeing a park (CVSR), than that's an important first step toward eventual commuter rail. If this happens (which is far from guaranteed of course) it'll be a lot easier to add a 9th or 10th (or 25th for that matter) mile to the route than to get it started to begin with.

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Bingo. I think Akron Metro wants to start with this because it can afford to do it. The incremental cost of providing a starter commuter rail service on this route could be small enough ($50 million or less) that it could be funded out of an FTA "Small Starts" grant. I understand starting with this route on the north end rather than going up to Hudson because it avoids the politically sensitive issue of going through Silver Lake. If the heavens don't fall and the earth doesn't open up with the coming of this new rail service, and there is actually is some new development and transit ridership resulting from this, then folks in Silver Lake might not be so scared of it (especially if the Route 8 soundwalls and the rail line exchanged positions).

 

As for the south end of the rail line, I'm not sure I understand that choice. If it were me, I'd continue the study area south to Akron-Canton Airport which would stay in Akron Metro's service area.

 

I frequented the Valley Business District when I was at Kent State in the 1980s, especially at a couple of nightspots in Liberty Commons -- what passed for smart growth back then! I usually hung out there with a couple of friends from UofA. The rail line could easily link up with PARTA's express buses to Kent, which head east out of Akron on Market Street and then to I-76, right where the Goodyear Corporate Campus is located.

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Well I don't disagree that this will end up turning into some kind of commuter line at some point.  The previous studies were mainly Cleveland-centric of how to get a commuter rail line down to Akron.  I don't think the paths chosen had enough bang for the buck.  There were serious issues with getting into Akron crossing over some mainline tracks which turned out to be prohibitively expensive. 

  I don't believe the Cuyahoga Valley line has ever been looked at in a serious study as a commuter railroad.  There will be huge amount of support for using this railroad once this study gets going.  UA, Goodyear, and CAK will be the biggest beneficiaries of such a rail line.  I don't see how the people that do the study will be able to avoid looking at CAK as an obvious, natural stop.

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The previous studies were mainly Cleveland-centric of how to get a commuter rail line down to Akron.
The Cleveland Centric-ness of the previous plans was both a strength and a weakness. By going all the way to Cleveland, you add significantly to the ridership, but you also add to the cost and more importantly you add to the number of people that have to cooperate to make it happen and that can scream "Not in my back yard!"

 

I don't see how the people that do the study will be able to avoid looking at CAK as an obvious, natural stop.

With CAK, if this line ever goes there, the tracks are about 3/4 of a mile across 77 from the building. You could really easily put up a platform and have a van or bus waiting to take passengers over to the terminal. It sounds perfect.

 

UA, Goodyear, and CAK will be the biggest beneficiaries of such a rail line.
Why not put a station by the Football Hall of Fame too? A station at Fulton road would be within easy walking distance.

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Why not put a station by the Football Hall of Fame too? A station at Fulton road would be within easy walking distance.

 

It's outside of Akron Metro's service area. CAK is the farthest south one can take a train and still be in Akron Metro's service area. A co-local agreement with SARTA could be done to look at service south of CAK, but for some reason this was not pursued.

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The previous studies were mainly Cleveland-centric of how to get a commuter rail line down to Akron.
The Cleveland Centric-ness of the previous plans was both a strength and a weakness. By going all the way to Cleveland, you add significantly to the ridership, but you also add to the cost and more importantly you add to the number of people that have to cooperate to make it happen and that can scream "Not in my back yard!"

 

 

Well Keith, I think you're on the right track (no pun intended)... although, rather than NIMBY, I think you'll hear:  "We're not going to pay for THAT."

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Yep.

 

To me, the routes could be operated as:

 

> Valley Business District - Akron Northside - Kent

> Hudson - Downtown Akron - Canton

 

And after I did the above map, I realized that if commuter rail were operated as these two routes and in that manner, there would probably need to be a transfer station in the valley in the vicinity of Arlington Street.

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Hopefully those tracks can be lit up one after another with Metro service..  If I recall in the AMATs budget, they want to make the track from Akron to Kent a nice little walkway instead..  I really have no idea why.  Hopefully with this study they may delay that for potential rail re-use.

 

  To me, the study will be looking at only the most obvious and highest utilized section of track.  For example in the valley area it takes about 15 minutes to drive to a highway.  People often say they are in the middle of nowhere when they live down there because of that.  With a train stop I don't think they would feel that way anymore.  Most of the people living in the valley will have a destination of downtown Akron during the day so why not take a train if its faster than driving, incurs no parking costs, and no searching for parking spots.

 

The issue I see with the study is the scope of this and the potential to become rapidly something much bigger.  Basically, the study to me is looking at this track as 8 miles of metro service with likely extension to Akron Canton in the future.  That sounds great yes.  Well say SARTA & SCATS come along and say they want to participate in this rail link with Akron and the airport so that there are now 2 cities downtowns served by rail to the airport as well as real commuter service between Akron and Canton.  Does the equipment change for this more of a commuter rail vs a light rail that may have been staying in Akron area?  Certainly a double track would be needed at this point in sections. 

  Say then KSU/Kent/Parta want to get involved with this train stuff too once they see trains rolling from Akron to Canton.  I would think it would be more of a DMU service that would be set up there.  Or maybe they will be content with buses rolling to the Goodyear facility..  I highly doubt that.

  Finally after seeing all these trains going every which way from Kent to Akron to Canton, Hudson/Stow/CF/SL mayors and councils finally see the light and want to get on board and be connected too. 

  Will other communities sue to be a part of this network- Barberton, Macedonia, Peninsula, Ravenna?

  Surely there will be some push to connect to Cleveland..  My feeling is it will be through the valley and I think it will happen before there is Metro train service going into Hudson(hell freezing over?)

 

The above sounds like a pipe dream but the thing is the tracks are there.  Some crossings may need to be updated in certain sections.  Some approvals will need to be granted by certain agencies and RR companies to cross over.  The only thing missing is the locomotives and passenger cars and most important the political will to implement.  That is where this study will help to start to kick this off.  We shall see if the hard numbers bear out what I've been saying in regards to the Merriman Valley. 

 

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And after I did the above map, I realized that if commuter rail were operated as these two routes and in that manner, there would probably need to be a transfer station in the valley in the vicinity of Arlington Street.

I'm very confused in what you are saying here.  I'm guessing you meant there will be need to be a transfer station in Akron near Arlington.  I foresee most rail stops having buses/circulators meeting trains.  Why would this be any different?

 

Nevermind I figured out what you were saying.  I forgot that North Arlington is up in the Elizabeth valley.  That is the whole tricky area of doing anything with trains in Akron.  I doubt it will be easy getting into the downtown intramodal center across the various tracks with any kind of regular service.

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Hopefully those tracks can be lit up one after another with Metro service..  If I recall in the AMATs budget, they want to make the track from Akron to Kent a nice little walkway instead..  I really have no idea why.  Hopefully with this study they may delay that for potential rail re-use.

 

Akron Metro RTA also wants the bike path as they cannot get interest from a rail freight user for that right of way. They feel a bike path would provide the means to preserve the corridor. I think that's risky, but the lack of other immediate users and funding, that may be the only option to keep that right of way from decaying further.

 

To me, the study will be looking at only the most obvious and highest utilized section of track.  For example in the valley area it takes about 15 minutes to drive to a highway.  People often say they are in the middle of nowhere when they live down there because of that.  With a train stop I don't think they would feel that way anymore.  Most of the people living in the valley will have a destination of downtown Akron during the day so why not take a train if its faster than driving, incurs no parking costs, and no searching for parking spots.

 

Interesting.

 

Certainly a double track would be needed at this point in sections. 

 

A reliable and fairly frequent commuter rail service (every 20-30 minutes) can be operated with signaled single track and passing sidings.

 

  Will other communities sue to be a part of this network- Barberton, Macedonia, Peninsula, Ravenna?

 

If this thing works on a starter route or two, then the me-too factor will be a pretty powerful force. There will always be those who don't want it or don't think it will work in their area because they may have lived in the same place for so long they can't appreciate all that it has to offer to a rail service.

 

  Surely there will be some push to connect to Cleveland..  My feeling is it will be through the valley and I think it will happen before there is Metro train service going into Hudson(hell freezing over?)

 

Who knows.... Maybe the best option would be to bring back the old Northern Ohio high-speed electric line between Akron and Cleveland, much of which is occupied by Route 8 today!

 

EDIT: this was the Crittenden Cutoff -- a more direct, faster, double-track high-speed right of way for the Northern Ohio Traction & Light Co. (later became Ohio Edison now part of First Energy) between Cleveland, Akron, Canton and other cities on other routes. This was their pride and joy -- where their three-car express trains could cruise at 80 mph. Today, this is Route 8 where cars roll at a much slower pace and burn petroleum, most of which is imported from faraway lands, and pass through sprawling suburbs where you need a car to do everything....

 

But from 1913 to 1931, from south of Bedford to north of Cuyahoga Falls, this was the scene:

 

NOTLCrittendenCutoff-c1920s.jpg

 

 

Don't recognize this spot? You will. This is looking south at the crossing of Route 82 in Macedonia, with the NOT&L passenger station and electrical substation at right:

 

NOTLSR82-Macedonia-c1920s.jpg

 

 

A Supreme Court ruling that forced companies like NOT&L to divorce their electric utility and railway operations into separate ownerships, the Great Depression and the government's construction of paved highways doomed the NOT&L's interurban railways, which were abandoned in 1931. This was the view almost 20 years later:

 

NOTLSR82-Macedonia-c1950s.jpg

 

 

And almost exactly the same view today:

 

NOTLSR82-Macedonia-c2010s.jpg

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Remarkable.  Those trains and infrastructure look almost comparable to the Red Line... I guess it was the Vans dream to have these trains access downtown via the the (now) Blue/Green/Red Line ROW... Darn shame it never happened.

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Pretty freaky..  I live about a .5 north of that substation. 

 

  I'm contemplating whether to take a job with a company in Tower City..  Rail would be a very sweet option.  I'm not sure its worth it to drive 20-25 minutes up to Warrensville rd to hop on the Blue line..  I think I can be downtown in about 25..  Should I decide to work for this company I'll likely move since its a well paying position to Solon/Gates Mills for it.. I kid!

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Akron Metro RTA also wants the bike path as they cannot get interest from a rail freight user for that right of way. They feel a bike path would provide the means to preserve the corridor. I think that's risky, but the lack of other immediate users and funding, that may be the only option to keep that right of way from decaying further.

From the look of it on Google maps parts of it are already converted to bike path. Or at least it appears that way. (I wish it had been a bike path when I used to commute down 261.)

 

I'm contemplating whether to take a job with a company in Tower City..  Rail would be a very sweet option.  I'm not sure its worth it to drive 20-25 minutes up to Warrensville rd to hop on the Blue line..  I think I can be downtown in about 25.. 

My suggestion (to you or anyone else that's listening) if you do drive up and take the Blue line, drive all the way up to the Drexmore station. If you get there a few minutes before the blue line catch it there, if you end up just missing it, you can walk the 1/4 mile over to the Shaker Square station and catch the green line there. (Shaker Square doesn't have parking.) It'll save you waiting however long it it between the blue line trains, and there's no way to predict exactly how much time it'll take you to get there because of traffic. (Though afternoon traffic is worse at 271/480 than morning)

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Probably not worth it to drive to the Warrensville station.  So many lights, and then a ton of stops in Shaker.  The highway would be faster on all but the worst days.  I've heard that Canal Road is a decent shortcut from Macedonia to downtown, but I never did try it.

 

I'm contemplating whether to take a job with a company in Tower City..  Rail would be a very sweet option.  I'm not sure its worth it to drive 20-25 minutes up to Warrensville rd to hop on the Blue line..  I think I can be downtown in about 25.. 

My suggestion (to you or anyone else that's listening) if you do drive up and take the Blue line, drive all the way up to the Drexmore station. If you get there a few minutes before the blue line catch it there, if you end up just missing it, you can walk the 1/4 mile over to the Shaker Square station and catch the green line there. (Shaker Square doesn't have parking.) It'll save you waiting however long it it between the blue line trains, and there's no way to predict exactly how much time it'll take you to get there because of traffic. (Though afternoon traffic is worse at 271/480 than morning)

 

This would work better, but you're still probably better off driving.

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Probably not worth it to drive to the Warrensville station.  So many lights, and then a ton of stops in Shaker.  The highway would be faster on all but the worst days.  I've heard that Canal Road is a decent shortcut from Macedonia to downtown, but I never did try it.

 

I use Canal/Valley View all the time as my father lives in Macedonia. It's the same travel time as I-480/271 except during rush hours when I-480 is bad. There are times when I-480 takes 30 minutes to go from 77 to 271. I avoid that stretch of the road like the plague, especially in the afternoons.

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