Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Columbusite

Columbus: University District: South Campus Gateway

Recommended Posts

Dude the place does not attract hooligans..it attracts young professionals, old professionals, college students, and occasional harmless weirdos. Its not a hangout for thugs. Old bars generally attract much more riff-raff. I don't think new construction ever promised to come with a force field keeping assasins out. I remember all the hype about Easton mall being "infultrated". Man it sure is unfortunate that people have to leave their subdivisions and be subjected to what goes on in the real world from time to time.

 

"young professionals" = "riff-raff" in Cynthia Rowley, Sonia Rykiel and Ralph Lauren!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The number of violent crimes recorded by the FBI in 2003 was 6,215. The number of murders and homicides was 109. The violent crime rate was 8.6 per 1,000 people. (http://www.epodunk.com/cgi-bin/genInfo.php?locIndex=16549)

 

2005 numbers have it at 14.0 per 100,000 people, putting Columbus at #55 overall in the US. (http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0934323.html)

 

So yeah, business is booming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cincinnati has crime statistics by neighborhood every year including the current one. Does Columbus have something similar? Thats from 2003.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I read in the dispatch that the FBI crime statistics were not accurate.  Columbus police tacked about 10-15 more homicides on the FBI's numbers.  Murder rate wise, Columbus was #7 in the country in 2002 for big cities -

 

TEN WORST LARGE CITIES FOR MURDER, 2002

CITY

 

PER 100,000

(1) Washington, DC 45.8

(2) Detroit 42.0

(3) Baltimore 38.3

(4) Memphis 24.7

(5) Chicago 22.2

(6) Philadelphia 19.0

(7) Columbus 18.1

(8 Milwaukee 18.0

(9) Los Angeles 17.5

(10) Dallas 15.8

 

The numbers haven't changed too much according to Columbus Police --- The FBI somehow seems to think it's gone down, but I think I would trust local police over some FBI assistant compiling numbers from a "fact" sheet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now that the news is out, it's known that the individuals involved in the incident were not OSU students and did not live in an area where OSU students typically live.  But that's the whole problem -- The Gateway is for all intents and purposes part of the OSU campus and given the atmosphere consciously created by those bars it's inevitable that trouble is going to happen.  Except for Eddie George's and maybe Mad Mex which I've never been to the other three are meat markets and so fights are going to happen and happen often, aside from the fact that the DJ's and bar staff encourage mob-mindset behavior like more or less paying girls to dance on the bars and flash the crowd.  The whole thing is a part of the raunch culture that's developed out of hip-hop in the past 15 years and has been identified by a lot of cultural observers as a totally unexpected and paradoxical symptom of the feminist movement, TV, and other phenomena.  And despite their different interior themes, those three bars all play pretty much the exact same music (in fact I wouldn't doubt two of them have actually played the same song at the same time!) and attract an almost identical crowd except Skye Bar due to its vague techno leanings seems to attract more exchange students, Indians, and Asians.  And can anyone explain to me why Journey has suddenly made a resurgence?  I remember when those songs first came out and they were terrible, everything about the band was terrible, and now everyone born around 1986 is oddly going ape for them.   

 

The bigger problem and probably cause of this shooting is of course drugs, and if you don't think drugs aren't being used and changing hands at the Gateway just because you haven't seen it with your own eyes then you're naive.  There is always a very tense bridge that exists between low-class but big-time drug dealers and the smaller-time guys who buy from them and then distribute in the bars, the dorms, and so on.  If it were somehow possible to track it scientifically, I'd love to see just how much of the Summit & 5th area's "economy" is supported by OSU coke heads. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The whole thing is a part of the raunch culture that's developed out of hip-hop in the past 15 years and has been identified by a lot of cultural observers as a totally unexpected and paradoxical symptom of the feminist movement

 

 

LOL! Can you explain more about this?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a link:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Female_Chauvinist_Pigs:_Women_and_the_Rise_of_Raunch_Culture

 

 

Those of us born in the 70's still remember a time before rap and the current situation whereas people born from about 1983 onward can't.  People in college now spent their teenage years getting bombarded by Girls Gone Wild commercials, Viagra ads, had access to endless pornography on the internet, chatting online, cell phones, and music that's relentlessly insulting to women.  There's simply no way people can't be affected by it. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^Well I've run into this problem before talking to younger people about rap...they just don't believe me when I say rap was nothing but a blip in the pop world until at the very earliest around 1989.  For sure, single rock groups like Guns 'n Roses were way, way bigger than all of rap put together.  The Fat Boys were better known than NWA at the time and nobody talks about them now.  Rap came very close to dying around that time because of the backlash against MC Hammer, Vanilla Ice, Beastie Boys, Snow, DC Talk, etc.  Really it would have only taken one or two more things that ridiculous and one or two "real" rap groups to have not existed like Public Enemy and it would have been over. 

 

Well to illustrate my point about how different the mood (in fact the whole purpose) of the music is now, here are some vintage songs about killing your girlfriend/wife:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYZ50PjDTi8

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JecyHi0YAw4

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RuqUqNuh2nQ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JMeck you know what I like about books that talk about pop culture? ANYONE can write one! I love reading books by newspaper columnists that think they have pop culture figured out. I thoroughly enjoyed the book I read last year about how pop culture is making us so much smarter. It even suggests that we question whether or not chocolate pudding and other junk food are REALLY bad for us, that perhaps in 200 years we'll find out that it is basically what raw vegetables are percieved as today!

 

There are many feminists who don't believe women are empowered through wet t-shirt contests and rainbow parties. Rap music has pushed the envelope, but the envelope has always been pushed further in our culture; it didn't just start with feminism or rap music. I personally think that music is a reflection of culture as opposed to culture being a reflection of music. A person's role models as well as their socio-economic role will affect a person's character a lot more than a song on the radio.

The problem with your post is the arrogant undertone behind every post regarding morals. As if you're on some moral highground from being 6 years older than someone like me who grew up in the 90s as opposed to the late 80s. Please...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today's mainstream rap is just hair rock. Outrageous clothing, slutty subject manner, expensive cars, lack of substance and uncreative songwriting are the same whether poofy haired white kids with pink guitars or black guys with cartoonishly large clothing make it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

wait -- rap was hardly only a blip in the pop world before 1989. its been full on mainstream since run-dmc's first in 1984.

 

in fact i believe shortly later grunge was promoted in order to try to slow down its runaway popularity. after they fiiiiinally broke the color barrier on mtv -- 'yo mtv raps' started getting way too popular.

 

your conspiracy theory of the day.

 

it's like that. and that's the way it is.

 

Yomtvraps.jpg

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

>I personally think that music is a reflection of culture as opposed to culture being a reflection of music.

 

No, I think whatever's popular is 90% because because of how it's packaged and thrust on the people by media companies.  Things like the jam band scene and the real (not that California junk) punk scene are out there happening totally independent of big companies but they're sure as hell not on tv or the radio. 

 

I asked around this weekend as to why Journey has made a comeback and somebody told me it was on an episode of Family Guy and something else at roughly the same time.  That leads me to believe that "Black Betty" by Ram Jam is on some movie or TV soundtrack as well.  That song was pretty obscure for a long time and now suddenly meat market DJ's are playing it, well at least the first verse before the weird off-beat bridge.  Really, anything at any time can be made popular again, Spuds Mackenzie, Beer Wolf, etc. are all waiting for their day back in the sunshine.   

 

Music and especially movies have a tremendous effect on what people know and how they think about things.  Movies have greater authority than pretty much anything else...once just a few months after reading a monograph on the Jamestown Colony someone was absolutely sure that John Smith married Pocahontas because that's how it happens in the Disney movie.  Well there is no historical record that John Smith ever made out with Pocahontas and in fact there is no record he ever had any relationship of any kind.  It got pretty heated because I couldn't believe this dude, who by the way was my boss, refused to believe that a book I had read was correct and Disney just made shit up to play with people's emotions.  There's no theme park where you go to see how great records were made unlike Disney MGM studios or Universal...people continue to be fascinated by movie celebrities and how movies are made.  For me, music was always an area of intense interest and I never cared about movies when I was a kid or now.   

 

And how much of MTV's programming in the late 80's was rap?  Maybe one hour a day.  The name of the news program after all was "This day in Rock", not "This day in Rap".  I wouldn't doubt Tom Petty got more airplay on MTV in the 80's than any rap group and you sure as hell wouldn't see him on there now.  Heck, I remember Roy Orbison videos on MTV!  There's this way "The 80's" are being packaged these days that don't really reflect the full range of what was going on.  But people allow the media to tell them how things were and how to think about them.  I'll give an example...if you have a party illuminated just by colored light bulbs but use a flash on your camera it'll wash everything out.  Eventually you'll forget looking at the photos that there were colored light bulbs at all and that the light level was low.  The media is full of that kind of stuff, some unintentional like that, but a whole lot of it intentional.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well just for the record black betty by ram jam was a very, very popular hit song and later often played at sports arenas, so it never really went away. also, there is no theme park where you can go see classic records made, but all is not lost there are documentaries. for example, there is a dvd of the making of born to run that is fascinating in parts.

 

as for mtv, they were racist in the extreme and had to be dragged late into the rap era kicking and screaming. yo was a hit and rawk was on its deathbed so of course it had to stopped. thus grunge. didnt work.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^^ MTV is more racist now that it's mostly the type of rap that makes young blacks look like fools. No black people on TV is less racist than only showing negative imagery of blacks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I asked around this weekend as to why Journey has made a comeback and somebody told me it was on an episode of Family Guy and something else at roughly the same time.

 

In addition to Family Guy, "Don't Stop Believing" was featured prominently in the conclusion of The Sopranos, as well as in a Hillary Clinton campaign announcement parodying the Sopranos. The plot thickens.

 

But what do I know: I'm just a suburb boy, born and raised north of Detroit.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some dynamite reporting by Mr. Geraci of The Lantern.  His scoop on this nursing student is so huge he didn't even need to get any other sources or quotes.  What's amazing is a week later tons of people still don't know about this incident.  Why?  Primarily because no visual came out of it.  Had the shooting happened out in the mall section of the development and not in a stairwell in the parking garage, there would have been dramatic visuals.  Had the victim been an OSU student, it would have been bigger news.  Had it happened during the school year it would have been much bigger news.  This incident really is a study in the caprices of circumstance and how big of a news story can be made.   

 

Holiday results in death of one

Man shot, killed in south campus gateway after fireworks

Anthony Geraci

Issue date: 7/10/07 Section: Campus

 

 

Adrienne Payawal took extra precautions the night of Columbus' annual fireworks display. Payawal, a senior in nursing and South Campus Gateway resident, said she knew there would be large crowds throughout the night because of Red, White & BOOM!

 

After the smoke cleared from the downtown fireworks and campus crowds dispersed, one man had been killed in the South Campus Gateway garage.

 

According to the Columbus Division of Police, Todd Lockett, 21, suffered a gunshot wound to the head in the parking garage at approximately 2:30 a.m. July 4. Lockett was taken to the OSU Medical Center where he died from his injuries.

 

Dante Jones, 22, of 2068 Woodland Ave., was later charged with one count of murder.

 

Thursday, Jones' bail was set at $1 million, according to the Franklin County clerk of courts office. A preliminary hearing is scheduled for Friday.

 

Payawal, who works at OSU hospitals, decided to drive to work on the night of July 3 to avoid the excessive amounts of drunken people in the Gateway.

 

"I knew it was going to be a crazy night," Payawal said.

 

Payawal added that there were more people than usual in the Gateway when she parked her car at 11:45 p.m. in the garage where the shooting occurred.

 

Later in the night, however, Payawal said her roommate thought she heard fireworks from their apartment, but the next day realized they were, in fact, the gunshots.

 

Despite what happened, Payawal said she was realistic about the area around her apartment before she moved in. She said she knew it was going to be loud and crowded, but she did not expect violence.

 

"I don't necessarily feel unsafe," Payawal said. She also said she sees security officers all the time in the parking garage, outside and even sometimes in her building.

 

"I am hoping this is just an instance because of Red, White & BOOM!" she said.

 

The security staff for the Gateway was unable to comment on the shooting or the security in place that night.

 

Anthony Geraci can be reached at geraci.9@osu.edu.

Page 1 of 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My internet went out at the house mid-post a day or two ago, I know you've all been waiting for my response so here it is:

 

 

>but all is not lost there are documentaries. for example, there is a dvd of the making of born to run that is fascinating in parts.

 

Sure, there are true music documentaries out there, but people are much more into the poppy documentaries made by VH-1 and so on which never get into details about how musicians actually came up with the music, lyrics, or how it was recorded.  Luckily youtube is now full of them.  There is also a cable channel called Ovation which is something like channel #220 in my area which has good music, art, and other cultural documentaries on it all the time.  In fact I was watching it recently when they aired a fantastic Chuck Berry documentary and a group of people who were friends with a roommate came back from a bar and blurted out "who's that black dude on stage" and then when he played Johnny B. Goode "Oh, he plays the Marty McFly song".  Then there was a break from the live concert where he showed of his cars and suddenly eyes and ears perked up as if we were watching an episode of that MTV car show when this thing was made in 1987 or 1988.  The younger generations, white and black, seem to have a complete ignorance of the blues and early rock & roll.  I saw Chuck D speak in 2001 about two weeks after the so-called riot in Cincinnati and I got pretty worked up because he was repeating rumors for his own benefit about the incident (it's not as if he was there, and I wasn't either) but one of the interesting things he talked about (and really I didn't think he was an exceptional speaker and what I just said and what I'm about to say are the only two points I remember from the talk) was that due to the rise of rap black youth today are completely unaware of the blues, etc., and actively make fun of guitar playing.  In fact the culture at large is now making fun of guitar playing through air guitar competitions and the Guitar Hero video game.  This whole phrase “party like a rock star” appeared but I don’t think any of those people really grasp what that means.   

 

The big, towering, fundamental difference between pop music now and what it was 50 years ago (and there has been a steady slide in this direction) is that vernacular music used to function as a respite from the endless physical toil of agrarian and industrial life.  Instead now since so few American kids and young adults have any idea what tough physical work is the music and pop culture itself exists as a way for people to pretend to experience “real” things.  Rappers and blacks in general are continually presented by pop culture as “real”, whites as having had it easy, and therein lies the hook by which the large white audience for rap has been cultivated.  What's really bad is that I think a lot of white kids are growing up thinking their voice has no audience and so don't even attempt to get involved in music.       

 

 

>as for mtv, they were racist in the extreme and had to be dragged late into the rap era kicking and screaming. yo was a hit and rawk was on its deathbed so of course it had to stopped. thus grunge. didnt work.

 

Well MTV has always kept country off its airwaves too, despite it being the #1 selling music genre.  MTV never played jazz, blues, bluegrass, zydeco, opera, musicals, etc., etc.   

 

But even into the mid-90’s non-hair and non-alternative rock music was played on MTV, specifically The Rolling Stones “Love is Strong” off of Voodoo lounge got heavy airplay as did The Black Crowes’ “Remedy”, a killer song whose video has unfortunately been removed from youtube or else I'd post it here.  Aerosmith’s corny stuff from the Get A Grip album got tons of play.  Marilyn Manson, Ministry, Nine Inch Nails, etc., weren’t “alternative”. 

 

Really I think the breakup of Guns ‘n’ Roses was the primary reason so-called alternative music was able to rise.  GNR was pretty much the biggest rock band since the Rolling Stones.  Their first record sold over 20 million copies and they are now approaching 100 million in total record sales, numbers way beyond that of any individual rapper, despite not having some big media machine running nostalgic documentaries on them (I mean, this entire young generation is growing up with unrelenting documentaries airing on Notorious BIG and 2Pac).  As illustrated by wimpy bands such as Weezer, record companies would much rather deal with nerds and dorks than deal with guys like Axl Rose who really would kick your ass or Ozzy who would bite the head off a bird in front of your face.       

 

But getting back to that Chuck Berry documentary, it closes with him playing an improvised lap steel bit in an empty theater with the lights fairly low.  The gear for the whole band is stacked around and the camera is behind him as the credits run.  It was totally fantastic and one of those times where I literally almost start crying over all that's been thrown out and paved over.  This country has invented dozens of instruments and music genres, written thousands of fantastic songs, and look at what the kids are growing up around.  Carson Daley and songs about gaudy jewelry. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From U Weekly:

 

 

Crime kept quiet

[1 Comment(s)]

 

By David Derby

 

I’d like to start off by sharing what a sad realization I just had. I was trying to do a bit of quick research for this article, to make myself sound at least a little bit credible, and it was quite a struggle. Going into it, I figured I could hop on Google or Ohio State’s website and find some facts and figures or at least news about some of the crime that has occurred near the campus area, specifically at the South Campus Gateway. But after 30 minutes I couldn’t find a thing. Not even on the Lantern website. So I gave up. I realized it was just more fuel for this article.

 

Let me paint a little picture for you. It was early morning on July 4, and my friends and I were coming home from a night of drinking at the Gateway. We were walking a friend of ours home through the parking garage at about 2:15 a.m. As my friend and I were walking home, we noticed a few cop cars speeding past us and didn’t think anything of it. Later, I found out that someone was shot and killed in the parking garage, just 15 minutes after we had walked through it. Had we been 15 minutes later, we could have been witness to a murder. Did you hear about this? I wouldn’t have if I wasn’t such a loyal reader of Corey Spring’s blog on the UWeekly web site. UWeekly even had pictures posted.

 

I don’t know about you, but when I go out on the weekends to the Gateway, I look over my shoulder. I make sure I’m never alone and always in a group of people (mind you, I am a 5’10” 180 lb. male; not a 115 lb. 5’4” female like many bar-goers). We’ve all heard the stories. Most of us know someone who has been mugged or assaulted off of High Street, at least a friend of a friend. Some of us, unfortunately, have probably even been victims of such violence or crime.

 

So why does this kind of behavior still occur? Well, first let’s start with lack of exposure and awareness. People lose sight of what is important. I try and avoid the evening news as much as possible, because all they report is the bad and sensationalized stories. But where did I find out about the latest kidnapping, or at least supposed kidnapping that occurred near the Gateway (I couldn’t find any information on this story)? On the local news station.

 

Apparently a volunteer summer basketball coach was kidnapped outside of Eddie George’s Grill, no more than a week ago. Don’t ask me if he was found or not, because there is no info out there to be found. So what I want to know is why the University doesn’t have something students can check to get the latest safety information, good or bad. Shouldn’t we be made aware of crime issues that are occurring just off campus at a highly promoted student hot spot? If there is such a service, it’s a well-kept secret.

 

Speaking of what a great job the University does of keeping its students safe, how about providing students with safe transportation home from the bars? The CABS doesn’t run past 7 p.m. on the weekdays or at all on the weekends. Ohio State likes to boast about their Student Safety Service vans that will come and pick you up when you call. That’s a great option — if you have your Buck ID on you, if you want to wait 45 minutes (if they manage to come at all), and if you can get picked up before they stop running shortly after the bars close.

 

And what about all the freakin’ police I see crawling all over the Gateway? This past weekend, I showed up stone sober to find at least five police officers standing around at about 10 p.m., two of whom were flirting with two drunk girls. When we left, I saw two officers still hanging around, which made me feel very safe considering a murder occurred on a night where police were out in record numbers to keep us “safe.”

 

The state of things off campus and at the South Campus Gateway is unacceptable. The Gateway was built in a bad area in order to draw students to the neighborhood and make it a nicer area. The students were drawn, but the area hasn’t gotten any safer. Something needs to happen to fix this situation and it needs to happen soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wait a second; is this guy seriously suggesting that an upscale entertanment complex open all day and all night is not improving the neighborhood? Would this area be better off without patrons walking the streets nearby? Because last time I checked, crime more often occurs where criminals can't be seen as easily. The "eyes on the street" theory. It sounds like this guy is one of those conservatives that oppose anything new and looks for any excuse to say "I told you so".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

^^Wow...That article is one of the worst pieces of "journalism" I have read in a long time.  I don't even know where to begin.  I heard a piece on the radio the other day about the difficulties of traditional news papers and that if they aren't around in say the next twenty years all we will have is unverified "news" offered by the government, marketers and advertisers and internet crazies.  Maybe that day is already here.  What exactly is U Weekly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The guy who wrote that article needs to get the sand out of his vagina.

 

I don't understand why journalists are allowed to give opinions on things they don't know about. You can't just write articles that say "almost everyone knows someone that has been mugged or assaulted on High Street". Prove it! All he would have to do is call 911 or the local police district, or even OSU's police station and BAM he'd have a primary source that knows what the hell they're talking about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

UWeekly is a rag published by mainly college kids. In other words, it has no checks-and-balances that a typical newspaper or television station has. Anyone can publish anything they desire.

 

They aren't 'journalists', they are merely citizens voicing their opinion but stating it as fact.

 

You know, if he really wanted the facts, he could ask OSU's police department or the city of Columbus or the neighborhood association for the crime data. UK doesn't publish theirs online, but I have picked it up from their office. Took five minutes. This guy was just incredibly lazy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×