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Ohio Rail History & Preservation Thread

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Not Ohio, but sometimes its shadow is seen/felt here........

 

10:06 AM TUE SEPTEMBER 3, 2013

Buffalo Central Terminal restoration plans aim to boost regional tourism

By ASHLEY HIRTZEL

 

Restoration efforts continue for Buffalo’s historic Central Terminal. The plans focus on bringing life back to the large train station while boosting cultural tourism in the area.

 

Buffalo’s Central Terminal opened its doors in 1929. It was built to resemble Grand Central Station in New York City. During that time, the train station was filled with a variety of businesses where people could drop off their dry cleaning, get their shoes shined, or grab a meal in the restaurant.

 

Central Terminal Restoration Corporation’s Executive Director Marilyn Rodgers says on June 22, 1929 there were 2,200 people in the concourse at a sit-down luncheon. She says it gives people an idea of how big it is inside.

 

READ MORE AT:

http://news.wbfo.org/post/buffalo-central-terminal-restoration-plans-aim-boost-regional-tourism

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Yep. They did.

 

A recent picture of the Hudson depot......

http://akronrrclub.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/dsc048441.jpg

 

In happier days, where trains from New York, Washington, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, Youngstown, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Columbus, Akron and Cleveland converged. In the late 1940s, 30 passenger trains a day came through here and most stopped.......

 

hudson_oh_depot1.jpg

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Fostoria, Ohio now has a brand new park for those who love to watch trains.  The "Iron Triangle" RailPark had it's official opening today.  It is located at one of the busiest rail junctions in Ohio with over 100 trains a day.

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BTW, this is the depot on the west side of town on West Main, not the grand brick depot that's in downtown Kent.

 

133-YEAR-OLD KENT RAILROAD DEPOT MAY DISAPPEAR IF BUYER NOT FOUND

by JEREMY NOBILE | RECORD-COURIER REPORTER Published: May 28, 2014 1:00AM

 

Kent -- A symbol of this city's iconic industrial roots is in jeopardy.

 

A former railroad depot with ties to the city's early beginnings may be torn down if a private investor doesn't come forward to save it.

 

But whether the building on West Main Street adjacent to a Carter Lumber facility, with its chipped red siding, dingy white doors, broken windows and weathered foundation, can actually be saved remains unclear.

 

READ MORE AT:

http://www.auroraadvocate.com/news%20local/2014/05/28/133-year-old-kent-railroad-depot-may-disappear-if-buyer-not-found

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BTW, this is the depot on the west side of town on West Main, not the grand brick depot that's in downtown Kent.

 

133-YEAR-OLD KENT RAILROAD DEPOT MAY DISAPPEAR IF BUYER NOT FOUND

by JEREMY NOBILE | RECORD-COURIER REPORTER Published: May 28, 2014 1:00AM

 

Kent -- A symbol of this city's iconic industrial roots is in jeopardy.

 

A former railroad depot with ties to the city's early beginnings may be torn down if a private investor doesn't come forward to save it.

 

But whether the building on West Main Street adjacent to a Carter Lumber facility, with its chipped red siding, dingy white doors, broken windows and weathered foundation, can actually be saved remains unclear.

 

READ MORE AT:

http://www.auroraadvocate.com/news%20local/2014/05/28/133-year-old-kent-railroad-depot-may-disappear-if-buyer-not-found

 

Anyone know whatever happened with this?

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Saga of Ashtabula train disaster endures after 140 years (photos, videos)

By Brian Albrecht, The Plain Dealer

on December 28, 2016 at 5:05 AM, updated December 28, 2016 at 5:06 AM

 

ASHTABULA, Ohio - Today, 140 years ago, Mattie Brunner had less than two days to live.

 

So did Jonathan Rice, Martha Smith and almost 100 other passengers aboard a train crossing a bridge high over the Ashtabula River on Dec. 29, 1876.

 

The westbound train, pulled by two engines to plow through drifting snow, had nearly crossed the 157-foot-long span when the bridge suddenly collapsed.

 

MORE:

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2016/12/saga_of_ashtabula_train_disast.html

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The Dinkey and The Interurban in Delaware

 

An Exhibit of the Delaware County Historical Society

at The Meeker Homestead Museum on Sundays 2pm – 5pm

 

The people of Delaware County have always been on the move.  At first, on foot, on horseback, on buggies, and wagons. Later moving by stage coach, on bicycle, and on Trains.  Then came Street Cars and the Interurban.

 

Delaware had railroads since the 1850’s, for hauling freight and passengers to across the country.  Local transportation, however, was strictly horse and buggy.  Just before the turn of the century it would take 16 hours to travel by stage coach from Columbus to Delaware and not a very pleasant trip.

In 1892, The City of Delaware introduced an electric railway passenger service providing a good portion of the City with the Streetcars, some called them “Dinkeys”.

 

In 1903, Delaware gained an accessible transportation line to Columbus and Marion called Columbus, Delaware & Marion Railway (C.D. & M.), an electrically run Interurban rail line.

 

Come visit an exciting era in the growth of Central Ohio through display photographs, newspaper articles, and other archived items from the Delaware County Historical Society’s collection along with additional loaned artifacts. Some of the exhibit items have not been seen for nearly 100 years. Step into a very progressive time-period, for the country and for Delaware County.

 

This is important time, worthy of a visit to understand how Delaware City and County developed.

 

The Meeker Homestead Museum is located at 2690 Stratford Road, Delaware near the intersection of US 23, SR 315 and the recently constructed access road Meeker Way (Map and Directions).  Admission to the museum is free, but a donation of $5 to support operating costs is suggested.  Docents will be available to lead guided tours and answer questions.

 

www.delawareohiohistory.org

180802905.jpg

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