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  2. Telsa is moving into the HH Gregg space. It's to be a vehicle delivery and maintenance space and is much bigger than the current location.
  3. jmecklenborg

    Cincinnati: Restaurant News & Info

    ^ooh, I looked these people up and of course they're frauds. A 2015 bankruptcy, a recent seizure of $20k in assets. Daddy likes men and the mom sticks around for the money. I totally called it: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2841243/I-think-dad-gay-fools-local-doctor-Todd-Chrisley-s-son-claims-father-hiding-sexuality-family.html
  4. Gramarye

    Urban Food Deserts

    Definitely one of the most saturated grocery markets (per capita) I've ever personally encountered. One reason I'm not surprised at all that Kroger hasn't made a play for this area despite being headquartered in Ohio. And since the Dave's came in, I haven't really detected any talk of any food deserts anywhere in the area. Maybe there's one hiding off the radar somewhere, but if we've got East Akron covered, it's unlikely that there's an even more vulnerable population in the area. The higher end market is really saturated here, too, for the size of this burg. One reason (among many) independent specialty grocery West Point Market couldn't make it after they sold their prime location in Wallhaven to the developer who brought in the 365, and tried to make it in a cheaper but less visible location off the main drag in Fairlawn.
  5. X

    Global Warming

    So? Fossil fuel jobs also come and go. In fact, they most just go these days.
  6. jmecklenborg

    Cincinnati: Restaurant News & Info

    I had not heard of this show but upon watching that clip I immediately thought "these people aren't from Tennessee". Sure enough, I looked it up and they're from Atlanta. These types of southerners can never be trusted. They put on a hokey/religious face but only care about money and lie and cheat all day long to get it.
  7. Today
  8. E Rocc

    Urban Food Deserts

    I recall driving back from Chicago in 2001 or so and Forbes was on TAM talking about the corner stores and their prices. I was driving or else I would have called and suggested that he could invest, and use his clout to get others to, and still make money if they were so out of line. They weren't. Their expenses were very high. Distributors wouldn't deliver to them or would charge a premium because they had to put a guard on the truck. And yes, this was necessary. They dealt with lots of "shrinkage" and had to pay for security and security systems. Usually no insurance, or it was very expensive. The Dollar stores, which also get robbed a lot, are an improvement. Mostly because they are a big chain and have clout. But they can't really afford to stock much perishables.
  9. BigDipper 80

    Cincinnati: Restaurant News & Info

    I have no idea what this ridiculous-looking Nashville-based show is actually about, but I LOL'd ten seconds in when they went to eat at one of Nashville's "new trendy restaurants"... and surprise, they ended up at Cincinnati-based chain restaurant Nada. Props for places like Bakersfield et al for managing to successfully pass themselves off as stand-alone "local, non-chain" brands, but it also kind of sucks a bit that these other cities think those restaurants unique to their city and not a Cincinnati creation.
  10. GCrites80s

    Urban Food Deserts

    And small towns X, Y and Z might lose their drugstores and the gas station might cut their better foods such as fruit and prepared dishes.
  11. jeremyck01

    Urban Food Deserts

    I'm always shocked at how many grocery store options are available in Akron, from higher end to lower. There really is something for everyone and such a variety for the population size of Akron.
  12. Actually I would say that’s still a good deal. There’s huge well maintained mansions not far from there going east on Dexter. Now with the MLK exit open and it being along the strong I-71 corridor that area is ready to shoot up in value. There’s no geographical barriers to keep the wealth in East Walnut Hills from expanding north through the intact street grid into Evanston. It’s really nice housing stock too.
  13. Has anyone been able to get more information on this?
  14. BigDipper 80

    Favorite Streets in Ohio

    ^Yeah, I also considered listing a bunch of stuff around Shaker Square, but I figured I'd try to not hog every cool street in Cleveland! Euclid Heights Blvd in C.H. also has some great apartment rows.
  15. mu2010

    Favorite Streets in Ohio

    North Moreland Blvd can be used instead of Chapman for an intact version of what BigDipper is describing. Also Hampshire in Cleveland Heights.
  16. Ridiculous. Same story as Mt. Auburn - somebody trying to get huge money for a vacant house. The era of cheap houses in Evanston is over: https://www.sibcycline.com/Listing/CIN/1605042/1607-Dexter-Ave-Evanston-OH-45206
  17. With Richard Branson's Virgin Group investing in Brightline (which will soon be changed to Virgin Trains USA) and a private company looking to follow Brightline's model for a commuter rail project in Milwaukee (see latest post Private Intercity Passenger Rail Projects thread), it's looking more and more like the 3C Corridor (and some others in Ohio) would be good candidates for private investment/development to bring us train service. In fact, All Aboard Ohio has sent information to Brightline about the 3C, PGH-COL-Lima-FTW-CHI, DET-TOL-CLE-YTO-PGH, and CIN-CHI corridors about why they are worth considering for their investment.
  18. BigDipper 80

    Favorite Streets in Ohio

    Not a joke, I genuinely really like that street. Maybe it's me glamorizing "ruin porn" (which I try not to do), but it's so representative of how impressive a lot of E.C. used to be and how far it's fallen. Even in their overgrown, abandoned state, they're some really cool apartment buildings. There aren't many "apartment streets" like that around the state outside of a few areas on the east side of greater Cleveland. As for #1, most of the rest of West Boulevard is big single-family houses set back far from the street with huge, grand trees. I generally don't find Cleveland's "rich" or "upper middle class" houses quite as appealing as what one might find in East Walnut Hills or something, but the overall effect of West Boulevard really makes a great impression. https://www.google.com/maps/@41.4733172,-81.7554846,3a,75y,193.93h,85.19t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1s0BceLF8ehTSFBT5tBRlSUQ!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo1.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3D0BceLF8ehTSFBT5tBRlSUQ%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D153.4709%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100
  19. Now this is getting interesting: A private company is looking to start a 55-mile commuter rail line in Milwaukee. Looks like they are following the Brightline (which is now Virgin Trains USA) model of using the train to generate profits from real estate development. And, the company doesn't own the rail line they want to operate on: Group seeking $1.4 billion for private commuter rail project A New York capital raising firm is helping a Wisconsin company attempt to raise more than $1.4 billion to support a private commuter rail project in metro Milwaukee along with related real estate development. The project by Transit Innovations LLC would use existing freight lines to create the commuter system, called E-Way. The company says it would build 21 new stations and use two existing ones along 55 miles of track across Milwaukee and Waukesha counties. Full article at: https://www.biztimes.com/2018/industries/banking-finance/group-seeking-1-4-billion-for-private-commuter-rail-project/?fbclid=IwAR0uUjs1YoGt8ADfbXD4o8gz3s9yt-rQ2qOm_oUZWgzvvC3-h213uQ6WLPU
  20. So who will repace Shake Shack at Nucleus?
  21. To be more broad-based for Ohio, Milwaukee's start-up commuter rail route is 55 miles with 70% of the investment for station-area real estate. Ohio route length comparables: > Cincinnati-Dayton > Delaware-Columbus-Newark > Cleveland-Akron-Canton > Lorain-Cleveland-Aurora Just sayin'...
  22. jmecklenborg

    Favorite Streets in Ohio

    I saw professors up to no good in Athens on the regular. Picking up students, dating students, buying drugs for students, stalking students, etc.
  23. edale

    Favorite Streets in Ohio

    #2 is awesome! It is still detached housing, but the lack of front setback and very minimal side setbacks almost makes the street look like an eclectic stretch of rowhouses in Pittsburgh or something. Very cool, but disappointing to see the nothingness that the street empties out to. I imagine a lot of Cleveland looked like this street at one point. I get the appeal of #1 with the old apartment buildings on one side of the street and the huge parkways and front yards. Would be cooler if the other side of the street was also developed with those multi family buildings. Is #3 a joke? It looks totally abandoned and riddled with trash...
  24. GCrites80s

    Favorite Streets in Ohio

    The divorce rate for SSU professors is sky high for the same reason -- except that Athens is 100X nicer than Portsmouth and tons of people are NOT in a good mood.
  25. 327

    Global Warming

    Two things in this article. One, a reminder that green energy jobs come and go, and two, that fossil fuels are still the basis of many green things. None of this means we should stop investing in green energy. We simply have to. But we should also be realistic about what it can do for us, now and in the immediate future. It's not yet reliable in terms of power generation or employment. https://www.cleveland.com/business/2018/12/lg-fuel-cell-systems-quitting-ohio-after-receiving-18-million-in-state-and-federal-grants.html
  26. Yesterday
  27. I think it's a great show of confidence in the downtown area that Shake Shack is opening up...
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